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Seneca Salmon die-off cause relevant to our area??


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This was sent to me by a buddy and thought I'd share it. VERY interesting. Effects on on drinking water supplies and on humans as well?

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/researchers-reveal-why-seattle-salmon-bite-dust-after-rain-180976463/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&fbclid=IwAR3X44AuIgWbHNigUALZ72UzTM1XK7sLld8q4-KOmf1oukx6lhRUFeAFfb0

 

Edited by Sk8man
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My concern is .... if this chemical can affect small roadside streams, then how about the same runoff from roadside traffic all around our local lakes and streams? Combine this with the runoff of "nutrients" spread by farmers and all the rest of the toxic substances entering those same lakes & streams. Are any departments currently testing for this chemical buildup?


https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/researchers-reveal-why-seattle-salmon-bite-dust-after-rain-180976463/?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=socialmedia&fbclid=IwAR3X44AuIgWbHNigUALZ72UzTM1XK7sLld8q4-KOmf1oukx6lhRUFeAFfb0

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Perhaps the poor salmon and steelhead shape of 2014-2015 tough winters was from breakdown of tires from road salt/de-icing chemicals with additional sand aggregate flushing stuff into tribs. 

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I'm not disagreeing about geographical politics, but that has less than nothing to do with this article. It was published in "Science", which is certainly not geopolitically constrained, and it was peer-reviewed by the best minds in the field, almost certainly including academics from overseas. "Science" is one of the big three (Science, Nature, Cell) and is nearly impossible to get into without jumping through ridiculous hoops to ensure rigor and reproducibility. 

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If Dr. Landrigan wanted to be thorough, he would discuss relative contributions of industrial nations without classifying them in terms other than their pollutant loads, like developing nation, which the Paris accords did for China and India, certainly the Number 1 and 2 dischargers currently. 

 

If the concern is a compound used in tire manufacture, the way to get it out of the waste stream is to drive less, or remove the compound (and that requires telling China to remove it, as I think our entire rubber industry has been “orientalized”).  Tires wear out on roads, and there isn't enough money in the world to build treatment systems for all the roads.

 

 

 

 

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Another question posed by these articles is why is this just happening now.  Is this a new additive, or has it taken years to build up to a critical point in the environment?  At any rate, in NYS, passive stormwater treatment has been required in many municipalities for quite a while,.  But a question for our friends at NYSDEC and USGS is whether this "new" compound may be linked to problems with Coho in Lake Ontario, where they do not seem as prevalent as they were when the programs were initiated. 

 

When I was working on the Rochester Embayment Remedial Action Plan, we listed cadmium as a Chemical of Concern, and the individual who introduced this named tires as a source.  I could find no literature indicating a significant role for Cadmium in tire manufacture, but I would not be surprised to find Cadmium in the pigments for all those double yellow lines that people kind of ignore a lot anymore. 

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