Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

First of all, where the hell are the brown trout? Reports have been dismal, and I patrolled 3.5 miles of shoreline today without a sniff. The lack of cookie cutters is very concerning to me.

 

Anywho, I brought my 6 year old with me today, and after a few hours I needed to get the kid some action. No worries, the lakers were happy to oblige. We did a half dozen in short order in cowbells and death traps and went in at 10:30 with a very happy kid. Gambler rigs really are top notch laker producers. Boat ran great (finally!). 80-110 was best for us but sounds like they found them shallower and deeper. Thank goodness for lakers I guess.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

IMG_8671.jpegIMG_0415.JPGIMG_0416.JPGIMG_0417.JPGIMG_0428.JPG64035625420__7577C6A1-2AEE-482D-93AD-A629ABE4998F.jpegIMG_0429.JPGIMG_8671.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

The browns might survive better if the state stocked at night.It also could put more in sodus bay away from the cormorants.Up here in pultneyville Ive seen just a few birds,dont know if the stock went in yet.

They do prey on the stockers and roost here in the harbor when they come in.

The harbor had some great fishing for browns last fall

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Cormorants are only one part of the puzzle. The breeding program itself is another. While the fish is happily growing in their tanks and runways they are never exposed to danger like for instance a single walleye in the mix that they would have to learn to hide from. Also the feeding setup in the hatchery is made for the convenience of the workers not taking into account  the constant danger that fish need to learn about in order to survive in the wild. The very protected setup of pen rearing does not help this situation either.

The end result is that when stocked fish are released ,they are literally "babes in the wild" and everybody comes over to feast on these dumb tasty morsels. The hatcheries would do well to research systems that might produce a more careful and wily hatchling.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...