kingpossible

Run UV spoon colors or non UV spoon colors

45 posts in this topic

Like I said, then there's that fluke that totally blows everything we thought right out of the water. :lol:

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UV tape or spray has a blue/purple haze to it. Whether it's the haze or the UV, I don't care, they catch fish when the sun's out.

Lake Ontario salmon fishing charters

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2 hours ago, Jerryriggin 2 said:

This is all as we humans see it. Sure science looks at rods and cones in fish eyes and thinks how they will see the colors. I for one think it's a bunch of bs. I have caught hundreds of kings at below 100 feet down with a clear red John king meat rig.

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Fish strike for reasons beside  sight. They can hone in on vibration, and scent, providing it's water soluble 80% of my fishing is for muskies and I know I could get a reaction strike from a fish with a socket wrench given the right time and location.

Location and timing are the two most important factors. if the fish aren't there doesn't much mater what you use

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Your absolutely correct, as I say in my original post!!

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Fish strike for reasons beside  sight. They can hone in on vibration, and scent, providing it's water soluble 80% of my fishing is for muskies and I know I could get a reaction strike from a fish with a socket wrench given the right time and location.

Location and timing are the two most important factors. if the fish aren't there doesn't much mater what you use

Hahaha! Love the point. And can I get me a socket lure?! Should it be on tighten or loosen?! I guess that has to do with timing! Lol.

Sorry... couldn't help myself!

 

 

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9 hours ago, greenboatluke said:

Hahaha! Love the point. And can I get me a socket lure?! Should it be on tighten or loosen?! I guess that has to do with timing! Lol.

Sorry... couldn't help myself! emoji23.png

 

 

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I'd go with a Snap On they put righty tighty--lefty loosy if ya forget. :lol:

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Ok, make your own decisions of the following, but this is my take:

 

In clear blue open ocean water, most colors penetrate somewhat until about 160 feet (50 m).  But keep in mind that the stronger colors at that depth are blues and greens.  In the coastal water (think greener water), the stronger colors are greens and yellows.  Maybe this is why green is a more popular color in Lake Ontario vs. Lake Michigan.  I was also reading that UV penetrates well into very clear water, but hardly at all in dirtier water.

light_penetration.jpg

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I'm with Jerryriggin2 on this one as far as the conclusion being based on what WE are able to see. How did they get the data from the fish? How would they be able to measure what fish see down deep? How did they separate out vibrations, or other movement being  accountable for a response? Generalizing vision from one species to another is riddled with problems.

Edited by Sk8man

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Florescent glow...light emmiting.
Light emmiting in dark conditions allows you as a human to see the color being emmited, whether it is emmiting light as a glow, or generation of light in a bulb that has colored glass. When it's dark we dont know what color it really is, until it lights. Maybe a fish can see some colors. But, if the glowing light from a lure did not glow florescent color in the dark, no ultraviolet light at all, I don't think any of us could tell what color the lure is, let alone even see it much.
So if we or the fish was looking up at the lure, during high sun daylight, from below and towards the bright sky and a mirror of the surface, could you or the fish see color of the lure? Not likely. It would appear as silhouette against the bright overhead. Mostly black. Looking down towards darker depths, again my theory is you or the fish could see better, the color of a glowing fluorescent color against the dark depths and the reflection of the brighter overhead.
On the same plane, maybe then the light diffuse would have a significant impact on the color of a lure. Ultraviolet light would enhance some UV colors based on the stain of the water, and maybe not relying on a light emmited glow from a lure.
Only guesses on what a fish can see in colors. No digital camera eye is the same as a biological eye. A camera can enhance colors. We or fish cannot. What a camera sees simply isn't the same.
What a fish cues on as a response to feeding is multi sensory, not unlike us in some ways. My guess is like us, what we don't see, we respond first by hearing with our ears. A fish uses the sensory lateral line and reponds to vibration, like our ears do.
Next is our eyes, the ears have told us the direction to look. We see high contrast first, as a fish I would think a flash of silver like a mirror would pinpoint activity quickly at distance.
As we or the fish get closer, all senses are covering the curiosity. Color will give the next clue as the target and it's desired familiarity. A little different color raises more curiosity.
Lastly, I still believe action of the lure is more critical to the commitment of a strike than a color. That is the sound, the vibration, that the fish feels that is the trigger. Either the big thump of a flasher simulation of a feeding salmon creating the frenzy of feeding, or the small high frequency vibs of the spoon or fly that simulate a bait swimming in distress.
In the end, we are trying to fool a prehistoric pea sized brain, that essentially has not changed in thousands of years. We are the ones who have turned it into science and we are the ones relying more on gadgets and trends....the fish still win in the day that all the fisherman's tricks and technology don't work to put fish on the line.
That's why we love fishing, and not so much the catching, although if nothing else it gets us to try new things, or at least consensus agreement that the fishing was good, but the catching sucked in group discussion over the days end beer. Choose your colors!...still did it change the days end discussion? Some body will say purple with pink polka dots worked for them!...on a snap on torque wrench set on 60 foot lbs. The new trend!

cent frum my notso smartphone

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Most fish see in color, the retina of a fishes eye contain two types of cells, rods and cones. The cones are used for day vision and are the cells that see color. Rods are used for night vision and cannot distinguish colors, although they can see light intensity. In most "freshwater" fish, the eyes proscess both rods and cones, night feeder like walleye that live in greater depths have more rods. Day feeders bass, trout, salmon are more sensitive to color than night feeders. They have done studies that rainbows in the Pacific and salmon have color vision like humans. Now our brown trout are capable of sharply focusing on near and far objects at the same time and clearly see differant colors at differant distances. To see what fish can see or can't, I use this site for info. www.seagrant.wisc.edu . Selecting Lure Colors for Successful Fishing - Wisconsin Sea Grant.

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I'm with Jerryriggin2 on this one as far as the conclusion being based on what WE are able to see. How did they get the data from the fish? How would they be able to measure what fish see down deep? How did they separate out vibrations, or other movement being  accountable for a response? Generalizing vision from one species to another is riddled with problems.

I believe the chart and depths of visible light are based on physics, the way light will pass through the medium of H2O. The question of how well fish see and for whatever reason is totally different.


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This is all written by human study on a fish a creature with the brain the size of a pea. And is all as we the humans see how there eyes should see color. Nobody has ever got a fish to answer the question how they see color.

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This is all written by human study on a fish a creature with the brain the size of a pea. And is all as we the humans see how there eyes should see color. Nobody has ever got a fish to answer the question how they see color.

 

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Good point. Goddamn fish not answering our questions. The nerve.

 

 

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Still the same thing research done by humans as we see the light through there eyes. Fact is no one knows for sure it's all a guess as to how they see it. Heck they might see everything in black and white no one knows for sure. But there sure is a lot of pretty colors to catch the fishermen.

 

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Save your breath guys, so called experience trumps sceince I'm out.

Edited by pap

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I think I worded myself wrong, about no visible light, I ment it to be enough visible white light to keep the color sceme's to stay at the colors they are as we know them. Water acts as a selective filter, it filters out one by one as the light descends, it's gradual. Most of the red is gone from the light, at 5ft. Some of the Orange is gone in the first 10ft. Less of yellow is lost at 10ft. At 25ft most of the orange is gone. At 35 most of the yellow is gone. This continues through the spectrum until all is left is violet light and that fades out after hundreds of feet. Ok so if we swim down 30 ft and take a picture most objects would appear blue, green, violet and/ or black. Neon colors don't loose their colors like spectrum colors. Ultraviolet is found after violet, which is invisable to humans. Like violet it go to extreme depths, when a neon color is hit by the invisible ultraviolet it glows or "fluoresces" the more foreign products are in the water, mineral, algae, pollen, water fleas, things change. Sometimes for the better. I think I came across as the water, light was gone as in black. Sometime we forget that everyone is on deck with whatever ones talking about.




in conversation with Dr. Bruce Tufts Queens University ( Tufts Lab ) he told me fish don't see UV. As most of his research was with warm water species I asked if this applied to trout and salmon and he said it did..
Further searching on the net looking for scientific articles it said that salmon fry could see UV while in the rivers but lost the ability when the smolt and enter the ocean or big lakes.
 
 

Ok, so since we can't see UV, is the paint used on UV spoons actually a NEON Color? Or are they spraying on paint that has a UV color, that we can't see.....so is the paint like a water color, clear to us? I'm unclear on this. Also, since UV is on the blue/violate end, are all UV lures bluish/ violet in appearance, to the fish, since we can't see it. I guess we will never know what they see, just use it and see if it works.

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The answer is glow with UV.  

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