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Got a question for you seasoned salmon guys. Last year us eastern guys were blessed to have kings. I'm into walleye fisherman so I never had to cross this bridge. So OK I'm trolling 2.5mph to get 2.3 mph at the ball. Ok we hook up and it feels like a horse we get it up on the surface and along the boat. I'm not a power lifter or a noodle arm but I couldn't get the net from behind the and make the scoop. So I went and bought a thinner net figuring there's to much resistance using my walleye net. The other net had a bigger bucket yet a lot more net in the water. It was easier but I guess what would have been the smartest thing to do looking back on it would have been to back the speed off. What's your guys Take on it. What do you guys do. As a eye angler and 2.2 mph I never had to cross this bridge.

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I don't mean over the side of the boat I mean to actually net the fish. I have a swimplatform which my kicker is mounted to so as I see on TV I can't net head first off the stern so I net off the sides my gripe is to net the fish from tail to head as we only had 1 hook in the fleshy part of the mouth. Is it impossible to net a salmon from tail first?? like I do most my walleyes.

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I don't mean over the side of the boat I mean to actually net the fish. I have a swimplatform which my kicker is mounted to so as I see on TV I can't net head first off the stern so I net off the sides my gripe is to net the fish from tail to head as we only had 1 hook in the fleshy part of the mouth. Is it impossible to net a salmon from tail first?? like I do most my walleyes.
We net every fish head first off the stern... What TV show said you couldn't?

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I know there has been a lot of controversy previously here about this question of netting from the head or tail of the fish and despite strong opinions we are left witht the fact that both methods work  if the  person with the net knows what they are doing. I was schooled by old timers back in the 1960's fishing the Finger Lakes and every one of them netted trout from behind and low so that the fish  did not see the net or get spooked but it takes practice and a degree of skill. The problem of the common practice of netting from the head is that a) the fish can and do easily get spooked and take off like a rocket if not really fully tired out from the fight. b) there is an increased risk of knocking the lure or hook out of the mouth with the net; especially with inexperienced netters. An important facet of the netting operation is where in the boat you attempt to net the fish. (All these comments are assuming you have a large long handled net). Netting from the back there is the risk of the fish diving under the prop as they near the boat (especially with large kings and big browns). In netting from toward the back at the side (salmon and rainbows/steelies) often try to keep up with the boat and swim along on the side) and when they don't see the net (presented behind and under them they are only capable of moving forward and if they turn around and run they are in the net. The logical comment here would be yeh but they can take off forward. They may on occasion try it but if they are feeling the pressure of the line and swimming to keep up with the boat they seldom realize that the net is there or what is about to happen. If repeated unsuccessful attempts are made here trying to net them from the head or tail it often spooks them if you're not real quick and adept at it so you're stuck with whatever works. Basically, it is necessary to plan and communicate before the fish arrives at the boat so that the person with the rod is on the same page and communicating with the netter about exactly what is intended and what is happening. Over the years I've found that reducing boat speed to let the fish pull the boat somewhat while using the drag of the reel to control it  tends to tire out the fish the best and gradually bringing to the rear side posiition without exposing the net to the fish and then scooping them from underneath and behind is the most workable on my boat and I haven't lost a fish in many many years doing it this way. I know this may fly in the face of what many if not most guys including the "experts" are doing but with either way the developed skill (and quickness)of the netter is the most important variable.

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Posted (edited)

We usually try to keep the fish directly at the back of the boat but if they go to the side so be it.When they are ready the person fighting the fish backs up and lifts the head up, netting head first. Never had a problem like this. Sk8man is 100% right about  experience on the net, they know when the fish can be netted. One thing for sure is don't horse the fish, they tend to break line that way no matter what test.

Edited by Firechief48

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Head first always, and never leave the net hanging in the water. A quick netting stab exucuted at just the right time is what you want. If you have a deep basket you either need a clip to hold it, or hold it in your hand until you make your stab.

 

Communication from the netman to the person on the rod is imperative no matter how you choose to net.

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All our fish are netted head first and off the stern. We will maneuver the boat on a big boy to keep him centered off the stern. On big boys we prefer wind and waves at our back and will position the boat that way if possible before netting a big King. Agree a quick stab under the fishes head is the technique. Never let the net bag drag in the water before you make your move. Clear other rods, riggers, divers etc. before he gets to back of the boat if you think you got a trophy fish. Why take a chance??

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All good ideas, the only way I thought would be safe as the pig only had the circle hook in the fleshy part off to the side. So I was afraid that the triple hooks from the fly would get caught in the net and not allow the fish get all the way in the net. The resistance from the water going through the net kept me from doing a good net job and we lost it anyway:tmi:;( but hey the season will be here soon!! 

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, Sk8man said:

I know there has been a lot of controversy previously here about this question of netting from the head or tail of the fish and despite strong opinions we are left witht the fact that both methods work  if the  person with the net knows what they are doing. I was schooled by old timers back in the 1960's fishing the Finger Lakes and every one of them netted trout from behind and low so that the fish  did not see the net or get spooked but it takes practice and a degree of skill. The problem of the common practice of netting from the head is that a) the fish can and do easily get spooked and take off like a rocket if not really fully tired out from the fight. b) there is an increased risk of knocking the lure or hook out of the mouth with the net; especially with inexperienced netters. An important facet of the netting operation is where in the boat you attempt to net the fish. (All these comments are assuming you have a large long handled net). Netting from the back there is the risk of the fish diving under the prop as they near the boat (especially with large kings and big browns). In netting from toward the back at the side (salmon and rainbows/steelies) often try to keep up with the boat and swim along on the side) and when they don't see the net (presented behind and under them they are only capable of moving forward and if they turn around and run they are in the net. The logical comment here would be yeh but they can take off forward. They may on occasion try it but if they are feeling the pressure of the line and swimming to keep up with the boat they seldom realize that the net is there or what is about to happen. If repeated unsuccessful attempts are made here trying to net them from the head or tail it often spooks them if you're not real quick and adept at it so you're stuck with whatever works. Basically, it is necessary to plan and communicate before the fish arrives at the boat so that the person with the rod is on the same page and communicating with the netter about exactly what is intended and what is happening. Over the years I've found that reducing boat speed to let the fish pull the boat somewhat while using the drag of the reel to control it  tends to tire out the fish the best and gradually bringing to the rear side posiition without exposing the net to the fish and then scooping them from underneath and behind is the most workable on my boat and I haven't lost a fish in many many years doing it this way. I know this may fly in the face of what many if not most guys including the "experts" are doing but with either way the developed skill (and quickness)of the netter is the most important variable.

 

Thanks Les!!! aka PAP.

Edited by Xxx

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18 hours ago, Tyee II said:

Head first always, and never leave the net hanging in the water. A quick netting stab exucuted at just the right time is what you want. If you have a deep basket you either need a clip to hold it, or hold it in your hand until you make your stab.

 

Communication from the netman to the person on the rod is imperative no matter how you choose to net.

X2 works great

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I asked virtually the same question last year after my fishing buddy lost a few good fish at the net. Poor technique. I suggest reading that thread I started, and all the goos answers. But bottom lines are as follows, based on answered received and more experience now: 1.  head first works better. 2. Biggest net you can buy. 3. It is a team effort. 3.  A fast  confident scoop, no half hearted efforts; get it done, don't be timid!.  We finally agreed that I would net all fish (he has bad knees) 4.  Only attempt to net a fish that is fought out and is tired, and is at the surface.  (not always possible, especially if caught on downrigger-short line) 5. On big fish, clear other lines if possible. You can slow down but do not stop, unless you want a tangled mess of other lines (including riggers). If you cleared all the other lines, then  by all means stop. If not  keep  forward motion going. 6, attach a clip to the net handle  to hold the basket and prevent it from going into the fishes face. One problem we had was my buddy failed to get the net deep enough in water and the net would go over top of the fish, or the hook would catch the net. 

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26 minutes ago, garrymny said:

I asked virtually the same question last year after my fishing buddy lost a few good fish at the net. Poor technique. I suggest reading that thread I started, and all the goos answers. But bottom lines are as follows, based on answered received and more experience now: 1.  head first works better. 2. Biggest net you can buy. 3. It is a team effort. 3.  A fast  confident scoop, no half hearted efforts; get it done, don't be timid!.  We finally agreed that I would net all fish (he has bad knees) 4.  Only attempt to net a fish that is fought out and is tired, and is at the surface.  (not always possible, especially if caught on downrigger-short line) 5. On big fish, clear other lines if possible. You can slow down but do not stop, unless you want a tangled mess of other lines (including riggers). If you cleared all the other lines, then  by all means stop. If not  keep  forward motion going. 6, attach a clip to the net handle  to hold the basket and prevent it from going into the fishes face. One problem we had was my buddy failed to get the net deep enough in water and the net would go over top of the fish, or the hook would catch the net. 

 

Thanks so much for the answers I was looking for. I'm not new at fishing just with these big hombres. The 16-19# fish were no problem but that horse which busted up a lot of gear and my 13 year old daughters took turns getting it to the boat and I blew the net job. I felt like a heel. They were PO'd at dad and rightfully so.  ;(  :-( thanks again guys I got a pretty good grip on things should things transpire next year!!

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All good so far. I will add on. 

 

Scenario- You can’t move a fish- assuming your line didn’t grab the 400 copper on the initial run, a stalemate usually indicates a big fish. The game is to let the fish tire before you even think about netting and yet the longer the battle goes the more likely a hook tears out. There is a sweet spot in the time spent fighting a fish. If a fish ain’t coming, try to clear lines. Try slowing way down. If the fish comes in but is still deep, speed up and strip some line off the reel. Rinse and repeat. Make sure the fish is on top before netting-head first. 

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When folks talk about a clip to keep your deep bellied net nice and tight I think they mean something like this?     I use a release to gather all the slack in the net so that when you go to net

from head first it doesn't "bloom" out in front and screw you up royally.         The clip lets the excess release as soon as you put some of the fish's weight on the bottom of the net.

 

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I fish solo a lot and even when i dont, most fish are netted along side with the boat slowed to idle and the rigger boom swept back. Granted im fishing an 18' aluminum. Head first, quick swipe witha big net....and heres the key....pull the the net back and let the pressure off the rod so the fish drops into the bag. Then grab the hoop and up in the boat. I only net off the stern with someone experienced so they dont drop the net into the prop. This year ill be running a kicker so that will let me net off the stern on the non kicker side.

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35 minutes ago, Fat Trout said:

I fish solo a lot and even when i dont, most fish are netted along side with the boat slowed to idle and the rigger boom swept back. Granted im fishing an 18' aluminum. Head first, quick swipe witha big net....and heres the key....pull the the net back and let the pressure off the rod so the fish drops into the bag. Then grab the hoop and up in the boat. I only net off the stern with someone experienced so they dont drop the net into the prop. This year ill be running a kicker so that will let me net off the stern on the non kicker side.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Lake Ontario United mobile app
 

 

That's a brilliant idea for keeping the net bag its self doesn't give you the green wiener!! But the problem I had with this horse I mean 25+ like in the old snagging era. Folks remember when high 20's mid 30's wasn't uncommon I didn't have enough strength to get the net over the fish. There was to much resistance against just the net itself to even get the net up to the net so I told my girls to walk towards me and we'll drop her right in. Notta. So I can see why they net in the direction of the flow of the boat not against it. Cause I wasn't strong enough to move the net towards the fish let alone deep enough to not touch the fish because that's exactly what happened I touched the fish after a good 1/2hr that fish took off towards the bow and turned right down and say good bye!!

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I have found that its best not to get too emotionally involved with netting fish.  Pick a method and practice it.  Maintain your sense of humor.  Its only a fish.  The most laughter on my boat last year came at netting time.  My buddy was recovering from an eye surgery. 

 

"One eye looks like we are one mile off shore and the other looks like two miles!"

 

After a couple of hard jabs to an open mouth, he managed to scoop the biggest of the year.  We were laughing like school kids.  I did insist he wind in for the rest of the trip and let the netting fall to me.   I am pretty good with the net, head first over the stern.  Springtime stick baits with the fish hanging on the back hook, speed and accuracy.  Vision, too!

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On 1/12/2019 at 6:28 AM, youp50 said:

I have found that its best not to get too emotionally involved with netting fish.  Pick a method and practice it.  Maintain your sense of humor.  Its only a fish.  The most laughter on my boat last year came at netting time.  My buddy was recovering from an eye surgery. 

 

"One eye looks like we are one mile off shore and the other looks like two miles!"

 

After a couple of hard jabs to an open mouth, he managed to scoop the biggest of the year.  We were laughing like school kids.  I did insist he wind in for the rest of the trip and let the netting fall to me.   I am pretty good with the net, head first over the stern.  Springtime stick baits with the fish hanging on the back hook, speed and accuracy.  Vision, too!

 

Thanks!!

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