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Finger lakes - Seneca, Canandaigua, Keuka, Cayuga - Lake Fork plastics on a dropper rig, for smallmouth-size perch (but fewer than Erie).

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Important to know where you are located for starters:smile:

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I bought a place between A-bay and Clayton a couple years ago, I only got out twice all last year with the flooding and once so far this year, but haven’t been able to find any perch. If anyone has any suggestions of places to try in this area or depths I should be trying I would appreciate it. Also, I typically used worms and minnows. Should I be trying something else? Thanks for any help.

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Eel Bay has traditionally been a decent spot. IMG_0322.JPG


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22 hours ago, Jason F said:

I bought a place between A-bay and Clayton a couple years ago, I only got out twice all last year with the flooding and once so far this year, but haven’t been able to find any perch. If anyone has any suggestions of places to try in this area or depths I should be trying I would appreciate it. Also, I typically used worms and minnows. Should I be trying something else? Thanks for any help.

Jason,

Goose Bay early, followed by Eel Bay now. Welcome aboard!

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That's like asking if I know a spot to pick mushrooms :twisted:.

 

The how's a little easier. Most guys anchor up and fish bait. Bring a LOT. Slip bobber, a couple hooks, light sinker to keep it down. Some guys drift with small jigs. GOOD OLD FASHIONED FISHING. Look for warmer water as the fish are spawning now, and a little color helps.

 

Bring a kid. Hit the right day and they'll be hooked because there can be a lot of action if you hit it right.

 

Finally, DON"T CROWD OTHER BOATS or run real close to them. These schools are spookier than they are given credit for.  If you are looking for boats to find fish, as you approach, find a spot comfortably to the outside. Generally you'll be on the bigger fish. Once you get them coming, keep bait in the water to keep them there by running multiple rods.

 

Nothing's worse than doing it all right, having fish coming, and having someone motor over the school you've worked to get going. A little thought and courtesy go a long way.

 

 

 

 

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39 minutes ago, Prof T said:

That's like asking if I know a spot to pick mushrooms :twisted:.

 

The how's a little easier. Most guys anchor up and fish bait. Bring a LOT. Slip bobber, a couple hooks, light sinker to keep it down. Some guys drift with small jigs. GOOD OLD FASHIONED FISHING. Look for warmer water as the fish are spawning now, and a little color helps.

 

Bring a kid. Hit the right day and they'll be hooked because there can be a lot of action if you hit it right.

 

Finally, DON"T CROWD OTHER BOATS or run real close to them. These schools are spookier than they are given credit for.  If you are looking for boats to find fish, as you approach, find a spot comfortably to the outside. Generally you'll be on the bigger fish. Once you get them coming, keep bait in the water to keep them there by running multiple rods.

 

Nothing's worse than doing it all right, having fish coming, and having someone motor over the school you've worked to get going. A little thought and courtesy go a long way.

 

 

 

 

Very good advice:yes:

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2 hours ago, Prof T said:

That's like asking if I know a spot to pick mushrooms :twisted:.

 

The how's a little easier. Most guys anchor up and fish bait. Bring a LOT. Slip bobber, a couple hooks, light sinker to keep it down. Some guys drift with small jigs. GOOD OLD FASHIONED FISHING. Look for warmer water as the fish are spawning now, and a little color helps.

 

Bring a kid. Hit the right day and they'll be hooked because there can be a lot of action if you hit it right.

 

Finally, DON"T CROWD OTHER BOATS or run real close to them. These schools are spookier than they are given credit for.  If you are looking for boats to find fish, as you approach, find a spot comfortably to the outside. Generally you'll be on the bigger fish. Once you get them coming, keep bait in the water to keep them there by running multiple rods.

 

Nothing's worse than doing it all right, having fish coming, and having someone motor over the school you've worked to get going. A little thought and courtesy go a long way.

 

 

 

 


By any chance do U know any good spots I can pick mushrooms this time of year:thinking:

 

LOL.  Great advice 

 

  • Haha 1

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By any chance do U know any good spots I can pick mushrooms this time of year:thinking:
 
LOL.  Great advice 
 

Glad you brought up the kid factor, my grandson is the reason I was asking about the fishing. Don’t want to take him out and strike out. We don’t see much bait fishing around here this time of year. Everyone is out trolling, myself included. Taken my grandson many times and kept him busy with worms fishing smallmouth and rock bass.


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Emerald shiner minnows are better than goldens imported from southern states. Selling emeralds is screwed up due to a "virus" deal concerning the transportation of emerald shiners. They can be taken in most Lake Ontario harbors now that have surface water temperatures up to 50 degrees F.

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Emerald shiner minnows are better than goldens imported from southern states. Selling emeralds is screwed up due to a "virus" deal concerning the transportation of emerald shiners. They can be taken in most Lake Ontario harbors now that have surface water temperatures up to 50 degrees F.

I agree but I caught these on fatheads


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That's like asking if I know a spot to pick mushrooms default_emoticon-0130-devil.gif.

 

The how's a little easier. Most guys anchor up and fish bait. Bring a LOT. Slip bobber, a couple hooks, light sinker to keep it down. Some guys drift with small jigs. GOOD OLD FASHIONED FISHING. Look for warmer water as the fish are spawning now, and a little color helps.

 

Bring a kid. Hit the right day and they'll be hooked because there can be a lot of action if you hit it right.

 

Finally, DON"T CROWD OTHER BOATS or run real close to them. These schools are spookier than they are given credit for.  If you are looking for boats to find fish, as you approach, find a spot comfortably to the outside. Generally you'll be on the bigger fish. Once you get them coming, keep bait in the water to keep them there by running multiple rods.

 

Nothing's worse than doing it all right, having fish coming, and having someone motor over the school you've worked to get going. A little thought and courtesy go a long way.

 

 

 

 

Prof T and I met on this forum and have become great friends. Glad I shared some “mushroom spots” and walleye techniques on the River with him cause he has returned the favor.

Now we’re both a little

more tight lipped!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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