Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Sign in to follow this  
Jack

Copper ??

Recommended Posts

Last season I picked up 2 dipsy wire set ups which out fished my riggers . So everything I read here was true . Now I would like to pick up a copper rig . But not sure how to run it .

Do you let copper out like wire with a loose drag then tighten it up a bit ?

If I am running 2 riggers and wire dipsies on either side ,when do you put the copper in ?

To keep tangles to a minium do you run it down the shoot or inline planner ?

Thanks for any help !!!!

JT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just one put er down the chute , but be careful letting out one blink of the eye and youll get a little mess :o , jst keep enuf resistance on line and spool so nutin backlashes ,not that i have ever done that. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd make plans to get that copper out of the chute and off to the side w/ inlines or big boards. Church Inlines can handle up to 300', copper rigs longer than that are better off out on big boards (actually I prefer the big boards for any length). Eventually a copper line in the middle of the chute is going to cause a problem w/ a fish coming in on one of the other lines. This is especially true if you're crew is inexperienced about moving rods etc. The way I look at it is if you have enough people to run 2 riggers, 2 dipsy's, and 1 copper then you got the numbers to run another deep or shallow copper board line and you should b/c it will probably increase the odds of locating fish. So If I were you I'd get 2 copper rigs of different lengths and plan to run them out to the sides where they are out of the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd make plans to get that copper out of the chute and off to the side w/ inlines or big boards. Church Inlines can handle up to 300', copper rigs longer than that are better off out on big boards (actually I prefer the big boards for any length). Eventually a copper line in the middle of the chute is going to cause a problem w/ a fish coming in on one of the other lines. This is especially true if you're crew is inexperienced about moving rods etc. The way I look at it is if you have enough people to run 2 riggers, 2 dipsy's, and 1 copper then you got the numbers to run another deep or shallow copper board line and you should b/c it will probably increase the odds of locating fish. So If I were you I'd get 2 copper rigs of different lengths and plan to run them out to the sides where they are out of the way.

What he said :yes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chowder , If you where to get just 2 copper rigs what lengths would they be ?

Thanks everyone for the Great info :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have enough experience w/ this stuff or know enough about how you fish to really give you a good answer on that. I will say that if you fish mostly for kings out of Sodus then maybe a 300 and a 500, and get the 500 marked w/ the shrink tube so you could use it down the chute as a 200 or a 400 if the conditions required it. I know some people attach the copper itself to the release on the boards w/ rubber bands(I don't do this!)) and if this works you could use the marked 500 out to the side as a 200 or 400. Hopefully someone w/ more experience will add their 2 cents on this excellent question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the depth your looking to achieve... 450' of copper will get you down 99'. 20-22' per 100' of copper. If you decide to only buy 1 setup then i would suggest a 600' copper. If your planning on buying two copper setups i would suggest buying 2 different lengths for example: 300' and 450' or 450' and 600' so that you can cover more water when running them on the boards. When running them on board you need to clip the release onto the backing. So you are forced into using the entire length of copper. When you run it down the chute you are flatlining it so you can run any length you want. A 600' copper down the chute gives you the option of working alot of different depths just by how much line you let out. No matter what you choose make sure you have your setups mark every 50' so you can know how much you do have out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YT,

Spring and Fall I fish out of the Genesee . During the summer I fish out of Sodus .

How do you set your drags for copper ? Is it anything like wire ?

Thanks again for all the good info ! JT

P.S. What do you normally run on the copper ? (spoon , SD ....)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack,

The 300 (most productive) and 400 (second most productive) and 500 copper have been most productive for me over the past 3 seasons. I keep the drag a little on the lighter side and then adjust it once you get the rod out of the holder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you should back up a little. Copper would be the last thing I equip my boat with. I can think of a ton of other things to help you put fish in the boat. I would consider two more downrigger rods to stack or two more diver set-ups or a couple of leadcore set-ups or a planer mast/otter boats or a thumper set-up....etc. etc. before copper. Copper is not some magical fishing secret.....it has been around since the turn of the century. You can achieve the same depths with pinch-on weights or torpedo divers without the hassle. Copper is a folly most of us get into when there is nothing left to buy or try. You have seen a lot play on this site and others because copper has become "new" again for a lot of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think you should back up a little. Copper would be the last thing I equip my boat with. I can think of a ton of other things to help you put fish in the boat. I would consider two more downrigger rods to stack or two more diver set-ups or a couple of leadcore set-ups or a planer mast/otter boats or a thumper set-up....etc. etc. before copper. Copper is not some magical fishing secret.....it has been around since the turn of the century. You can achieve the same depths with pinch-on weights or torpedo divers without the hassle. Copper is a folly most of us get into when there is nothing left to buy or try. You have seen a lot play on this site and others because copper has become "new" again for a lot of people.

I for one completly disagree with that opinion on the benefits of copper. Just my opinion :no:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too. Days when the riggers slow and wires slow, one rod keeps going. The copper rod. Stealth can be key on those days and copper is one of the most effective stealth rigs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack, it is not to say don't buy copper. I have four set-ups. If I was just fishing for fun and not tournaments......they never would see the light of day. IMO, there are easier ways to fish away "stealthy" from the boat. Make sure you try one first. I will bet you will not be impressed with the fight the fish gives on copper, and if you are fishing catch and release.......forget it. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a very practical guy, here's how I look at this issue; 1. You gotta find fish when you go fishing 2. You gotta attract the fish you find into striking something in the spread. So maybe it's a bit simplistic but I figure you're odds are gonna improve if you're spread covers not only the parts of the water column that you suspect will be most productive but covers by presenting the baits in a way that will be most productive. Problem is you don't know the presentation that's gonna be most productive when you start. So, I would suggest feeling out the fish w/ a simple balanced spread of lines w/ delivery devices (riggers and dipsy divers) and some lines w/out delivery devices (lead core/copper and under certain conditions(winter& spring) flat lines. I realize this view point is simplistic but hey it sure works for me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some great points on this thread.

I can't agree more with Gill-T when he says "If I was just fishing for fun and not tournaments......they never would see the light of day," and "I will bet you will not be impressed with the fight the fish gives on copper, and if you are fishing catch and release.......forget it." The fish take a beating especially on the longer coppers.

However, adding one to the spread doesn't hurt, and by all means who are we to say don't do it. My opinion is very similar to Legacy's in that you should "buy a 600' copper and run it down the chute. gives you the option of working alot of different depths just by how much line you let out. No matter what you choose make sure you have your setups mark every 50' so you can know how much you do have out."

Unless you can go buy each length this is the best option. Allows you to be versatile, and that's the name of the game out there if you want to be successful more times than not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took Yankee Troller's advice 2 seasons ago and picked up a 600' copper, metered every 100' from A TomMIk.

I run in it down the chute in Canandaigua Lake, and it is a very effective set up, versatile for different depths, and occasionally you have to move it a round the back of the boat to get it out of the way when reeling in another rod. Furthermore, it caught the biggest trout I have put in my boat on the lake at 12 lbs. ( I know no big deal to you salmon trollers, but hey it's close to home) :) The rod that A TOm Mik sells has nice action for copper fishing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last season was my 3rd season running copper. I now own a 200, 300, 450 and 600. Most days from May thru September I run one down the chute. Some days I run two on the big boards. All I know is that my hookup rate over 3 years has increased 33%. Some days as much as 50%.

During salmon season, nothing beats a white or chrome e-chip down the chute with a green crinkle fly. I usally don't post much, but I would have to say that adding at least a 600 would be a smart investment.

1WCwQA.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Legacy, you mention you've seen sink rates of 20-22' per 100' of copper. Obviously, that rate would vary depending on boat speed, currents, wave action, etc. Generally speaking, under what conditions would you typically see that sink rate?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ernie langtiene told me that was at 2.7mph when I started fishing copper.

[ Post made via Mobile Device ] mobile.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and 20' for flashers and 22' for spoons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack, another thing you could look into for minimizing problems between a chute copper and other lines is hook up a pike ball float to the copper so you can float that rig back and out of the back of the boat conflict zone if you need to. Also, not sure how you're boat is set up but you can stick a chute copper up in a rocket launcher holder to get it out of the way too. Set the drag a little light and it will be easier to get it out of there w/ a fish on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to Thank Everyone for all the Great input ! I have a 18' boat and will be buying just 1 set up for now so it looks like a 600' copper would be the most versatile way to go . (along with a pair of wire cutters :D ) Trying new things is half the fun fishing. (can't decide if spending money or catching fish is the other half)

Thanks again for all the help!!!

JT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...