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sstout

Another big cayuga brown

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Just happened about 20 mins ago. A hair over 10 lbs. Moonshine spoon

20200531_063804.jpg

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:yes: man....lately that brown population has looked very healthy (and hungry:lol:)

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28 minutes ago, Sk8man said:

:yes: man....lately that brown population has looked very healthy (and hungry:lol:)

Population is nowhere near what it was

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45 minutes ago, bandrus1 said:

Population is nowhere near what it was

Sweet fish but I would have to agree. Kinda just quit spring brown fishing there 10 years ago and went to Ontario.

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My aim has been trying to find big landlockeds. But instead I've been hitting big browns. I'm not complaining though 😆

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Posted (edited)

I was referring to the particular browns that have been caught and pictured recently not the numbers caught. Also browns can  be very elusive  especially until you tap into their specific habits and peculiarities. They are often mainly nocturnal feeders and not too many folks night fish anymore.:smile:

Edited by Sk8man
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55 minutes ago, Sk8man said:

I was referring to the particular browns that have been caught and pictured recently not the numbers caught. Also browns can  be very elusive  especially until you tap into their specific habits and peculiarities. They are often mainly nocturnal feeders and not too many folks night fish anymore.:smile:


SK8man, I'm interested in night fishing... but would you say that would have to be live bait fishing?  Or can you get them trolling the right spoons at night?

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Posted (edited)

Possible to get them trolling spoons but by far the best way is to either anchor up or (carefully) drift if the wind is right with live sawbellies. Jigging can also be productive  especially while letting live bait do its thing on other lines out nearby (get lakers and the occasional rainbow or salmon as well).Anyone doing it for the first time I'd say be very careful it can be very disorienting out there and especially after 12 or 1 AM when folks in lake homes turn their lights off:smile: Set up in your spot in the early evening when it is light and best to anchor. hang lanterns off your downriggers to bring the bait in the fish will follow. Tip: if your lantern doesn't have a "shade on the side) use some aluminum foil around the side facing the boat as the glare will mess with your vision otherwise.

Edited by Sk8man
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10 minutes ago, Sk8man said:

Possible to get them trolling spoons but by far the best way is to either anchor up or (carefully) drift if the wind is right with live sawbellies. Jigging can also be productive  especially while letting live bait do its thing on other lines out nearby (get lakers and the occasional rainbow or salmon as well).


Thanks for the tips... I knew sawbellies were the best way to go, I just have been avoiding that method just cause I don't want to deal with buying live bait and keeping it alive.  But, might try it sometime.  Nothing like being out on a calm night under the stars.

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You can also get them (especially browns and lakers) on frozen sawbellies but in that application not a s good as  live ones.

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2 minutes ago, Sk8man said:

You can also get them (especially browns and lakers) on frozen sawbellies but in that application not a s good as  live ones.


Cool.  Yeah, I've got a few in the freezer I've collected from fish that have spit them out on my boat.  It'd be easy to grab a bunch of the floaters on Seneca too.

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Mike you have a PM

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I have a friend who would catch massive Browns all night at Miliken in the spring. Several to many over 10 pounds a night. That was about 15 years ago at this point.

 

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6 hours ago, Sk8man said:

You can also get them (especially browns and lakers) on frozen sawbellies but in that application not a s good as  live ones.

Hello SK8 are you fishing under slip bobbers like 40 ft down? wondering i tried this on Hemlock and caught big largemouth and smallies suspended years ago

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Both the 9lb brown I cought 2 weeks ago and the 10lber this morning came really early in the morning at first light, on a partly cloudy morning. Both mornings had just a little bit of chop in the water, both caught within a quarter mile or so of each other....

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Posted (edited)

:lol: I haven't specifically night fished in a long time. I used to do it a lot on Canandaigua, Keuka and Seneca. back then I had specially rigged light weight Seth greens with 3 leaders and a sawbelly on each, sometimes just used two standard stillfishing rigs one near bottom and the other suspended and adjusted frequently to different depths. The slip bobber method can also be used in the shallower water especially on moonlight nights so they can see the bait contrasted against the sky. Usually I depended on the light from the lanterns out perpendicular to the boat ( or a headlight device surrounded by styrofoam hooked to the battery for short periods)  for light to bring the bait up to get the bugs attracted to the light and the fish came after the bai that was attracted to the bugs. Sometimes you'd see these big hulking beasts rising from the depths after the bait For lakers I fished from 80 -150 ft and for browns within 80 ft depths and near drop-offs. Used to get some real nice fish at the south end of Canandaigua, the Hammondsport end of Keuka, and near the Branchport launch, and out in front of Dresden on Seneca. There is nothing that compares with starting to fall asleep by yourself out there and hearing the drag going out on a rod and all of a sudden hearing a fish jumping somewhere out there and taking line (sometimes it would be a rainbow).....kinda like fishing with a blindfold:lol: There is another LOU member that used to be on here called the Rainbow Kid that fished the south end of Canandaigua at the same time I did and a number of the charter guys that night fished it migrated to Lake O  when the salmon fishing kicked into gear in the eighties.

Edited by Sk8man
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9 minutes ago, Sk8man said:

:lol: I haven't specifically night fished in a long time. I used to do it a lot on Canandaigua, Keuka and Seneca. back then I had specially rigged light weight Seth greens with 3 leaders and a sawbelly on each, sometimes just used two standard stillfishing rigs one near bottom and the other suspended and adjusted frequently to different depths. The slip bobber method can also be used in the shallower water especially on moonlight nights so they can see the bait contrasted against the sky. Usually I depended on the light from the lanterns out perpendicular to the boat ( or a headlight device surrounded by styrofoam hooked to the battery for short periods)  for light to bring the bait up to get the bugs attracted to the light and the fish came after the bai that was attracted to the bugs. Sometimes you'd see these big hulking beasts rising from the depths after the bait For lakers I fished from 80 -150 ft and for browns within 80 ft depths and near drop-offs. Used to get some real nice fish at the south end of Canandaigua, the Hammondsport end of Keuka, and near the Branchport launch, and out in front of Dresden on Seneca. There is nothing that compares with starting to fall asleep by yourself out there and hearing the drag going out on a rod and all of a sudden hearing a fish jumping somewhere out there and taking line (sometimes it would be a rainbow).....kinda like fishing with a blindfold:lol: There is another LOU member that used to be on here called the Rainbow Kid that fished the south end of Canandaigua at the same time I did and a number of the charter guys that night fished it migrated to Lake O  when the salmon fishing kicked into gear in the eighties.


How's that book coming, Les?  I'm ready to buy my copy.

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I have t get back to it I've been side tracked for quite a bit and thanks for asking.....got to get my butt in gear:smile:

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:lol: The pressure is on....

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I have a friend who would catch massive Browns all night at Miliken in the spring. Several to many over 10 pounds a night. That was about 15 years ago at this point.
 

I did the same thing back in the late 90’s. Drifted worms in the discharge.. salmon during the day and browns and smelt with a dip net at night! Had some awesome nights over there!


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app
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Possible to get them trolling spoons but by far the best way is to either anchor up or (carefully) drift if the wind is right with live sawbellies. Jigging can also be productive  especially while letting live bait do its thing on other lines out nearby (get lakers and the occasional rainbow or salmon as well).Anyone doing it for the first time I'd say be very careful it can be very disorienting out there and especially after 12 or 1 AM when folks in lake homes turn their lights off:smile: Set up in your spot in the early evening when it is light and best to anchor. hang lanterns off your downriggers to bring the bait in the fish will follow. Tip: if your lantern doesn't have a "shade on the side) use some aluminum foil around the side facing the boat as the glare will mess with your vision otherwise.



When using saws where are you targeting? Suspended fish over deep water and dropping straight down 20-25’ or more shallow along the shore with flatlines (no weight). Asking bc I use this method to catch big browns on my local reservoirs but I’ve always just trolled Cayuga.


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