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Fishnut

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I have a 2452 bayliner classic hardtop with a 78 gallon gas tank. When I go fishing for a weekend 2-1/2 days I’ll burn a full tank of gas. Is this typical of a boat this size.

Background: I’ll run out about 6 miles troll for 9 or 10 hrs and run back 6 to 8 miles. While running in and out I’m traveling 25 to 30 mph at 4250 to 4500 rpms.

 

 

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Interesting.

I have tried to assume my boats as I really have no idea. But figured gets
2-3 mpg at 25mph realistically (hope I'm wrong lol) 25'sportctaft

But that would mean your/my 1 trip out at 8 miles would burn roughly 4 gallons of gas at 6 trips thru 2.5 days be 24 gallons roughly meaning we burn 50+ gallons trolling for 20-30 hours....so say 2 gph burn at idle

Hopefully other have their imput too

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You should put your boat and trailer on a scale weigh it . Then compare the weight to the weight that is written on the factory plate in your boat. It may be that you have water logged flotation material which makes the boat very heavy. There is a reason why Bayliners are often called "Bilge liners"

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My boat is a garage queen. She gets to see water 8 times a year for 3 or 4 days each time. 5200 lbs fully loaded.

 

 

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Plate is 4300.

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What RPM are you guys trolling at? My boat with 2 bags out is about 700 to 900 RPM’s I wouldn’t think that’s too fast?


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If you want to lower your fuel consumption, you need to run it near its most economical cruise which will be lower speed. Look online for a review and performance report for your year and model. Look for a review that has a fuel consumption chart. Run the engine at that speed and then adjust your trim and tabs for max speed at that most economical rpm.

 

Trolling fuel consumption is a much smaller part of the picture and not a lot can be done to improve it, other than maybe 1 bag instead of 2 and adjust rpm accordingly.

 

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The best economical cruising speed/rpms on most inboard powered engines is 3,000 and you probably will get 1.5 - 1.8 mpg on a boat your size fully equipped with gear and people. Not sure what you have for power or if its a I/O. The I/o will get slightly better MPG because you can adjust your trim for less drag. Trolling will burn around 2 GPH with bags and the rpms that your  running. Your probably getting close to 1 mpg at the rpms you stated your running at to get to the fishing grounds. Based on your and  my numbers you  should be burning about  65 gallons give or take a few depending on conditions and pay load.

Edited by Bozeman Bob
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The best economical cruising speed/rpms on most inboard powered engines is 3,000 and you probably will get 1.5 - 1.8 mpg on a boat your size fully equipped with gear and people. Not sure what you have for power or if its a I/O. The I/o will get slightly better MPG because you can adjust your trim for less drag. Trolling will burn around 2 GPH with bags and the rpms that your  running. Your probably getting close to 1 mpg at the rpms you stated your running at to get to the fishing grounds. Based on your and  my numbers you  should be burning about  65 gallons give or take a few depending on conditions and pay load.

Thanks Bob I just wanted to be sure there was nothing wrong with my boat. It sounds like I’m pretty much in line. Thanks.


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If you want to lower your fuel consumption, you need to run it near its most economical cruise which will be lower speed. Look online for a review and performance report for your year and model. Look for a review that has a fuel consumption chart. Run the engine at that speed and then adjust your trim and tabs for max speed at that most economical rpm.
 
Trolling fuel consumption is a much smaller part of the picture and not a lot can be done to improve it, other than maybe 1 bag instead of 2 and adjust rpm accordingly.
 
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Thanks John. I just wanted to be sure I wasn’t way out of whack with my fuel consumption.
Thank you.


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I'm right there also maybe even a touch lower

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Thanks stoneam. I think I might try just one bag next trip. My rig idles at just over 500 RPM’s I might be ok with 1 bag.


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Secondary question. Which bag should I pull? Port or starboard?
My prop turns clockwise if your standing behind the boat looking at it.


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Secondary question. Which bag should I pull? Port or starboard?
My prop turns clockwise if your standing behind the boat looking at it.


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I have pulled 1and 2 bags don't notice a difference on which side.

What can you get down to with no bags? I get down to 2.1-2.2 without bags most days

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2 hours ago, stoneam2006 said:

I have pulled 1and 2 bags don't notice a difference on which side.

What can you get down to with no bags? I get down to 2.1-2.2 without bags most days

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no bags im at 2.5 to 3.0.

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It seems like everything comes together at 2800 rpm 23-25 mph trimed to the best it can be with just a slight bob at the bow. My Sea Ray had a 305 and I put a 350 in it and geared the lower unit to the hp and torque curve of what the cam and other goodies that come into play. I was rather pleased with the fuel to mileage I was getting, until the trolling came into play.;( That blew me away as to how much the old girl really took a liking to OPEC. So I made a decision to add a kicker and again I was blown away that I could troll for 8hrs on 3 gallons of fuel. So now the V8 gets used for to and fro, and I can go for days with out refueling. The only cost for me to adding a kicker was the Steer arm and the kicker straps to attach the arm. I made my I/O bracket, the quick disconnect is simple a air hose fitting. I’ve never looked back since I’ve gone to a kicker. I know I’m a little off direct subject, but I beat the $500.00 costs to a weeks worth of fishing. PAP.

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9 hours ago, Fishnut said:

Secondary question. Which bag should I pull? Port or starboard?
My prop turns clockwise if your standing behind the boat looking at it.


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Generally speaking it should go on the port side. If your trolling into a beam sea and the waves are hitting your starboard side then the bag goes to the starboard side as well. I would think with your idle at 500 rpms no bags would be needed. Sounds like you have no way to measure down speed and are just guessing what to troll at. I guess all you can do is go by your GPS and hope for the best. Most of the time our GPS might read close to 3mph and the fishhawk is at 2.3 - 2.5 but down currents may cause it to go the other way.  Trolling RPMs are generally around 600 and up, with no bags. If you have a I/O you can trim it all the way down and drop your trim tabs to slow it down a tenth or two. 2900-3100 is the sweet zone for cruising to the grounds. I will go from 1.5 GPH at 625- 650 rpms  to 2 GPH at 750 rpms according to my fuel flow meter. That's on a 28 x 11 with twins and one 350 ci  engine doing the work. 

Edited by Bozeman Bob
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I noticed that my 2052 trophy def burns alot more fuel while running with trim tabs down for smooth ride as you are pushing more water . Also do you have a trolling plate ? Plate down runs higher rpm for speed . Example I run 700 rpm for 2.2 to 2.7 gps speed no plate or 1000 rpm for 1.5ish plate down  , little more fuel , adds up over day of trolling . Hope this helps.

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My boat had a trolling plate on it when I bought it. I didn’t like it so I bought bags. 2 - 28” bags. They work great.
I’m thinking a kicker would surely pay for it self in short order. I’m guessing 3 years.
So what size kicker to push around a 4600 lb. boat 24 feet long??


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15 hp 4 stroke
[/
I was wondering if a 9.9 would be enough. Probably would in calm weather. But when we make the trip to The Great Lakes we fish when we can and we’ve been out in some pretty rough crap.
Do you think a 20hp 4 stroke would be too much?


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When the going gets tough and the big motor isn't running you'll want bigger no matter what you have 😀 but...a 15hp 4 stroke  with the right shaft length (e.g. long or extra .long) should do the job and will probably work fine without the extra weight of the 20. The reason I say 4 stroke is they (trolling motor size) seem to have more torque to push the boat at trolling speed rather than top end speed so they don't have to work as hard. I was actually able to do away with my EZ steering connector system once I switched to a new 4 stroke 9.8 from my 2 stroke 9.9 and can use it trolling against the wind which was more limited in the 2 stroke. The right prop may make a difference too I guess. As far as fuel consumption the new 4 strokes are very good on fuel compared with the older  2 strokes,but I'm not sure how a 15 would compare with a 20 in that regard as the 15 may have to work a bit harder while the 20 may not be as fuel efficient at the trolling range with heavier weight on the transom... I'm not sure.

Edited by Sk8man
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That’s the plan. Just want to get the rite size kicker. Got one for sale?


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I will chime in for reference here on what a slightly larger boat gets for another data point.  At optimal cruise I am about 1.4 gallons per mile or .7 miles per gallon which equates to roughly 35 gallons per hour at cruise.  Trolling I'm around 3 gallons per hour.  Typically I'm trolling around 800 RPMs to keep water across the rudders and oil pressure up, and will run a combination of bags depending on conditions (one bag going one direction, toss a second in for another direction etc.)  We have twin 454's and weigh around 16,000 pounds dry.  With a full tank of fuel we add around another 2000 pounds (305 gallon tank).  Cruise is around 3200 RPMs and 23 MPH in calm seas. 

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