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egcuth

Kayak fishing on Cayuga

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In recent years I've been fishing from my kayak around Meyers Point & occasionally by Taughannock. I've had good success with Browns, Lakers, & Salmon trolling close to the surface in April May and June.

Any chance I could be successful with this approach in November or December if I got a decent day weather wise? Any thoughts comments would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Ed

 

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My first thought would be aboiut safety rather than fishing success. Few if any people will be out onn the lake most of the time then, the water temps will be in the forties or less, even a brief "roll over" you'd be screwed. The weather especially in November is very unpredictable wind-wise..... not worth the chance from my point of view and I've winter fished in the middle of winter (Jan and Feb) in snow storms on Seneca with my 13 ft. Whaler in the past breaking ice up the canal with it on the way to the lake. NOT any more :lol:

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Hi Sk8man
Thank you so much for your response and concern.
The water is also quite cold in April and May as well and I try to take reasonable precautions. My kayak is a wide Hobie Pro Angler 12 with peddles. When the water temperature is cold I always stay very close to shore and never go on the water without a dry bag filled with extra clothing. Also, I check the hour by hour weather on multiple weather sights before going out. While I'm on the water I monitor the weather in real time using two different weather apps on my phone ( Radar Now and Storm Radar) which I carry in a water proof fitted bag around my neck.
Both places that I launch are about an hour + from home and sometimes I decide not to launch because of the weather when I arrive and many more times I get off the the water early because of approaching storms or rising wind.
Again thank you for your concern. I do LOVE to fish and hope I'm alive and healthy enough to be able to do it for many years to come. Also, if you or others have any additional safety suggestions I would love to hear them as well as information on my original question.
Thanks
Ed



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egcuth you have a PM

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you can be successful

 

And as stated above it is dangerous! you sound experienced and properly prepared 

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2 hours ago, Sk8man said:

My first thought would be aboiut safety rather than fishing success. Few if any people will be out onn the lake most of the time then, the water temps will be in the forties or less, even a brief "roll over" you'd be screwed. The weather especially in November is very unpredictable wind-wise..... not worth the chance from my point of view and I've winter fished in the middle of winter (Jan and Feb) in snow storms on Seneca with my 13 ft. Whaler in the past breaking ice up the canal with it on the way to the lake. NOT any more :lol:

Don't you ice fish Les?  :lol:

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Immersion Suit, Adult Universal Size, 110-330lbs.Here is a thought to add to your winter fishing

Edited by stinger

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:lol: Brian - Yep. I have however worn a float suit for the past 14 years after going through on Canandaigua up to my chin by myself in 2004. My extreme risk taking days are over (other than perhaps being married):lol:

Edited by Sk8man

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Thanks that would be great. I'm wondering if twitching my rod every 10 to 20 seconds while trolling would work better for me in calmer water? Also curious about the color combos you prefer?

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Hobies can be outfitted with outriggers. I used one in Hawaii for surf fishing, it was very stable and next to impossible to flip over. That might be a good safety measure in cold weather. The kits go for less than $200 which makes it a great investment

Edited by rolmops

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I ride a Hobie Outback on the Finger Lakes and near shore on Lake O  depending on the weather.

 

I'm about an hour away from T-falls (between Canandaigua & Geneva), so understand your concerns with the  the winds and how a slight difference in wind direction can make thing around the point tricky in a yak.  This time of year ( or in the spring) , you may also consider driving the 15 minutes down to Treman state park and peddle Cayuga inlet to the fish ladder.

 

Sure you're aware of all the safety issues with cold water, but I'll throw out the  "120 degrees" rule as a reminder - I've actually been wearing the dry suit since mid September when I'm on the water. 

 

I've had decent luck off Taughannock jigging or by pulling an assortment of shallow stick baits like Rapala x-raps back 100-150 ft

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Thanks for all the information. I was wondering what type of dry suit you have and how you manage relieving yourself on the water? Were you able to buy it locally? I thought about getting one a few years back. Maybe I should revisit that possibility.

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Hobies can be outfitted with outriggers. I used one in Hawaii for surf fishing, it was very stable and next to impossible to flip over. That might be a good safety measure in cold weather. The kits go for less than $200 which makes it a great investment
Thanks for the suggestion.

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On 11/2/2018 at 10:25 PM, egcuth said:

Thanks for all the information. I was wondering what type of dry suit you have and how you manage relieving yourself on the water? Were you able to buy it locally? 
 

 

I have a stohlquist EZ water suit - bought it on line a few years ago - no problems with the fit based on the sizing charts on their website.  It's not insulated, so I do layer up underneath it depending on air temps.  When I bought the suit, it was oversized enough for layering, since buying it, I've lost 60 lbs, so there's even more room for stuff underneath.  

 

The suit has a relief zipper then runs horizontal across your waistline, and because it's a Hobie, things drain easily out the drive well - I do use a cup or sponge to get some rinse water into the yak if needed. 

 

 I've found that with the SOT Hobie, your're exposed to the elements a bit more then expected, so the nice part about the suit is that it protects you from the wind and rain as well - and I have actually worn it early / late summer when conditions are rainy or cooler then normal.  Because I'm using my legs and not arms for propulsion, I don't have any issues with over heating or the suit binding up as I paddle. 

 

I wear a basic pair of Hodgman Neoprene Wade Shoes as foot wear with the dry suit.

 

 http://www.stohlquist.com/touring/drysuits/ez.html

 

http://www.hodgman.com/hodgman-wade-boots-wade-boots/hodgman-neoprene-wade-shoe/1347875.html

Edited by JJBat150

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Definitely buy a drysuit as JJ suggested. I've kayaked on Cayuga before on my Hobie Revo 13, and follow the 120 degree rule (if the combined temp of the air and water is below 120, then wear a drysuit).

 

I have a Kokatat drysuit, and while expensive, they can be a life saver, and Kokatat has a solid warranty program. 

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I got a Hobie Pro Angler 14 this fall and I've fished the Fingers/Ontario and the Niagara in the winter out of my 'winterized' 17' Alumacraft so I'm following this thread from a couple angles. Although I've been kayaking for over 40 years I have no intention of splashing my new Hobie this winter (except down in Mosquito Lagoon, Fla.) but I have been thinking about a dry suit for awhile. Does anybody have any experience with how these suits hold up if you use them for ice fishing as well boat use?

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I fish Seneca for the golden things with lines and cayuga for trout and salmon. Usually fish west side as I always get lucky with winds all winter.

Seneca just depends on winds...

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