Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Dane Vanderheyden said:

Does dipsy diver colour matter? Been fishing out of Bronte (Oakville Ont) and haven’t had any luck on dipsys yet.

are you using mono, braid or wire for you divers and do you have a dive chart to be able to know how much line to let out?

Ive always liked metalic green for salmon and texas red for rainbows

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

King Buffalo - we use mono, would like to get braid or wire but my uncles too cheap lol, yes we have a dive chart, and we use the O-ring

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to know why you are not getting dipsy hits , the mono is your answer . 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mono has a ton of stretch , which is bad for a dipsy. 

 

If you are great lakes salmon trolling , with the gear and speeds and depths you need to get to , mono don't cut it . 

 

Mono will and can work , but it certainly is not the best thing . 

 

Buy a 150 yard spool of 50 or 65# power pro  and put it over 20# test backing on a,line counter reel  and the right rod and see do yourself . 

 

20$ for the line . 

 

Some days , dipsy kill it . 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. In the 4 years I have been fishing lake o I have never caught a fish on my Mono dipsey. Plenty on wire.. So now I have two wire dipsies

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

first off how do you get the dipsy to trip with mono? braid or wire is needed to trip the diver. I use 17# ande mono for my backing then power pro for my main line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dane - Mono divers can and do work, but like everything have their place.  Once the water warms, mono divers will typically target steelhead above 40'.  If you get a NE wind and run offshore, mono divers can be high divers targeting early morning kings and steelhead.  

 

When there are no flea's, you can use braid as HB2 pointed out.  If fleas are out, wire is needed.

 

Personally, diver color is less important.  Black is what I prefer to run and have most confidence in, but I often run chrome diver, chrome based flashers on bright days.  Everybody has a fav diver color that works for them.  I run 12'-13' 30lb Big Game behind the divers before attaching flasher, fly, meat.  20-25 lb flouro if spoon fishing.

 

As already said, some days divers just light up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, relaxer said:

Dane - Mono divers can and do work, but like everything have their place.  Once the water warms, mono divers will typically target steelhead above 40'.  If you get a NE wind and run offshore, mono divers can be high divers targeting early morning kings and steelhead.  

 

When there are no flea's, you can use braid as HB2 pointed out.  If fleas are out, wire is needed.

 

Personally, diver color is less important.  Black is what I prefer to run and have most confidence in, but I often run chrome diver, chrome based flashers on bright days.  Everybody has a fav diver color that works for them.  I run 12'-13' 30lb Big Game behind the divers before attaching flasher, fly, meat.  20-25 lb flouro if spoon fishing.

 

As already said, some days divers just light up.

Disagree . I have been using 65 # power pro for about 10 years now , right a long side the my wire. The wire gets less fleas , but the braid  if checked more frequently works well with less of a learning curve . Such as,kinks and coils . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Out last weekend and the fleas were bad , I was running wire and my buddy was using braid, both had fleas on and he cleaned his line just as quick as mine 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Black or clear divers on Wire not braid.  Checking braid frequently = less time in the water which = less fish in the boat.  A 1000' spool of wire will fit perfectly on most reels.  Anything less than 1000' is rolling the dice when it comes to diver fishing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run 80lb braid and have minimal flea issues. It saws right through them.
I don’t think dipsy color matters at all. I have a green one and an orange one and couldn’t care less about color.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a 1000 ft spool of wire . 

 

I put 333 ft over my braid backing 

 

So when I get a kink and have to cut 150 ft off , I can replace 2 more times 

 

I don't put any more than 300 ft out on my dipsey rods,so only wire is in the water . 

 

I'm a cheapskate , so this is how I do it . 

 

I have one wire and  three  braid . I get fish on all . I always check my lines frequently because I am impatient . Also many times I find weeds or whatever on my line or the line / hook may not be right because I set it out wrong . Or a fish took a swipe At it and messed up the baithead . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought about not responding to this suggestion but after thinking about it I decided to pipe in:smile: I know a lot of folks like to 'cheap out" on things and I may be guilty on occasion myself with some things but not this one. Fishing line of any kind is probably the most important part of a set-up and it has to be strong enough and long enough for the job. Stranded wire is no exception to this and when using the standard 30 lb test wire the full 1,000 ft is the norm for many good reasons such as achieving the desired depth with minimal line out and less water resistance than monofilament, leadcore or braided copper and getting down to where the fish are. Most of us are glad to have the 1,000 ft. capacity without getting into the backing which is primarily on there for possible hang-ups on the bottom as much as anything. Seldom does an unruly king spool the 1,000 ft of wire and the backing serves its purpose tucked away until needed. Using less wire especially 333 ft subjects the connection of the wire to backing connection to undue wear (unnecessary potential failure point) because most of us frequently exceed the 333 ft. length with our dipsy set-ups getting down to where the fish are. Depending on the particular diver used some may not get past 100 ft. with that 333ft.setup so if fishing for Chinooks or lakers in the summer months you may be missing out on a lot of fish.A thousand foot of wire is usually less than $50.00 and it lasts a long time when properly taken care of. The practice outlined may not be saving as much as you expect if you have just one failure with the usual equipment attached.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I trust my knots . 

 

When I steelhead fly fish , I   have up to 5  knots between me and a fish . 

 

 

On my rigger rods I have 20 # , then 150 ft of 30 or 40 # , then 20#  Or 15# to my lure , and knot to swivel ,rarely  breaks . 

 

But my wire did have a kink in it last year I did not see ( well maybe I did )  and when I went to pop the dipsy  it broke and took 150 ft of wire ,my dipsy, a spinny and fly, and two swivels . Never had my braid break . 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And most fish from May to  the end are caught from 40 to 90 ft down . Well within range of a standard size dipsey . 

Yup , there are times they are deeper . But that's worst case scenario on my end of the lake . 

 

 

For a guy wanting to get in the dipsy game , buy a spool  65# braid and a standard size dipsy . Don't need a special rod with a twilly . As long as you have a line counter and med action downrigger rod , you are in . Might not be the best but will work . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a common misconception that you need to run out and put twillie tips on the end of your wire rods. You can run the wire until the top guide fails and that takes a lot of time on the water to do. I did it before I went to roller rods on all four of my wires rods.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United mobile app

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's more than just depth to the diver/line game. The steel line produces a distinct sonic signature in the water that fish can sense along their lateral line sensory organ and I believe that aggressively feeding fish respond positively to that sonic signature. Braid produces a different signature. I have seen negative fish mood days when braid outproduces wire but not often. Twilli tips are pretty cheap compared to a roller rod and you want to get a good ($) roller rod if you are going to go that route- cheap roller rods sometimes let the wire (especially the thin camo type AFW wire) get between the roller and the guide frame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...