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Over the weekend I took my boat out and the main motor, which runs off a single battery, starts right up fine. It runs for about 15 min to get to our spot and then i shut if off and run a kicker. After about 6 hours of fishing, and running a helix 5 and 2 electric big jons off the same battery, the main motor will barely turn over from the same battery and not be able to start. 

 

I wouldn't think the riggers would drain a battery like that, but i'm not sure if it's a power consumption issue or if the battery is just getting old and needs replacing? Also, just had the battery on the charger at 2 amps for about 30 hours and its still not up to 100%. That typical as well? 

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What type battery are you using? A deep cycle marine battery, or trolling battery, has several design differences. One key is plates: It has fewer, thicker plates allowing the battery to provide continuous power output over long time periods. Deep cycle batteries can be entirely drained and recharged many times, cranking batteries can't. Also check the water level in battery. You don’t want any plates uncovered. If low I use distilled water to top off.


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how old is the battery? I change mine every four years. sometimes the plates get loose and that is not good. boat batteries take a lot of abuse.

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Thanks for the feedback folks!

Didn't know there was a difference and just thought a marine battery was a marine battery. Looked up the part number and looks like its a starting/cranking battery so that might be the issue?

I'll give the water level a check too.

Not sure of the age. It came with the boat when I got it two years ago.

Thanks again!20200727_114539.jpeg

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I’ve found with marine batteries that you need to change every 3 or 4 years.  At that age they don’t seem to fully charge or hold a charge.  The voltage is down 1 to 1.5 volts from a new battery and that can be a problem for your riggers, and electronics.  You can load test and they appear to be OK but they just don’t hold a charge.  Replacing on a schedule seems to work.

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Posted (edited)

Start by replacing that battery and strongly consider putting in a battery switch and a 2nd "house" battery (Deep cycle). Start the boat on battery 1 (cranking) and then switch to battery 2 while trolling. This way you will never be left stranded, if you kill the house battery your starting battery will still be good. This would be a safety concern for me, especially if your kicker doesn't have a charging system. If weather kicks up out there and your only battery is dead it could put you in a very dangerous situation.

Edited by FishingFool34
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I will sometimes run both batteries at the same time but I make sure to keep an eye on my gauge so I don't end up with 2 dead batteries. Worst case scenario I can pull start my kicker and charge a battery with that alternator

Start by replacing that battery and strongly consider putting in a battery switch and a 2nd "house" battery (Deep cycle). Start the boat on battery 1 (cranking) and then switch to battery 2 while trolling. This way you will never be left stranded, if you kill the house battery your starting battery will still be good. This would be a safety concern for me, especially if your kicker doesn't have a charging system. If weather kicks up out there and your only battery is dead it could put you in a very dangerous situation.


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Start by replacing that battery and strongly consider putting in a battery switch and a 2nd "house" battery (Deep cycle). Start the boat on battery 1 (cranking) and then switch to battery 2 while trolling. This way you will never be left stranded, if you kill the house battery your starting battery will still be good. This would be a safety concern for me, especially if your kicker doesn't have a charging system. If weather kicks up out there and your only battery is dead it could put you in a very dangerous situation.
I agree. I try to be as safe as possible and do actually have two batteries on my boat. The one for the main motor, which was having issues, and one for my bow mounted trolling motor. On Saturday I just grabbed the bow mounted battery and hooked it up to the main to get back to the launch. Kinda a pain and if it got hairy quick it could be an issue. A switch is a good idea.

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7 minutes ago, Zinger11 said:

I will sometimes run both batteries at the same time but I make sure to keep an eye on my gauge so I don't end up with 2 dead batteries. Worst case scenario I can pull start my kicker and charge a battery with that alternator

 


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I will do this as well otherwise you’re only charging the battery you currently have selected. One thing I do when I have both selected is make sure I leave the kicker running when I go to start the main. That way I’m never completely dead in the water.

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I will sometimes run both batteries at the same time but I make sure to keep an eye on my gauge so I don't end up with 2 dead batteries. Worst case scenario I can pull start my kicker and charge a battery with that alternator


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Alternator would be nice but only have a little 4hp Yamaha 4 stroke kicker so not sure it would be possible

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I would get that battery tested, likely it is three or four years old and one of the first things that is a sign is it just doesn't have full capacity.  

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Heck it could be ten years old if it came with the boat. I don't trust batteries. I replace them every few years and always carry an extra one in case of a case.

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And then again I just traded in my combo starting/deep cycle and it was still fine but the date on it was Feb 2010:lol:

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