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Kevin J Legg

Best fillet knife

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Forschner makes some good blades. If you are looking for electric, good luck! I can't seem to find a good one.  I have just run the cheap ones til they burn out and get a new one.  I have tried Rapala and Hamilton Beach.  Unless someone has a better idea on here the next one I may try is from Mr. Twister.  I would gladly pay more for a quality electric if anyone knows of a rugged one.

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electric, I've always like the Rapala ones, but I really don't care for electric for trout/salmon. I believe I'm more efficient with a normal knife on trout/salmon.

standard knife, I like the Forschner 8" curved Breaking Knife because of the stouter blade, but their fillet knifes are very nice as well. Personally, I just don't care for the extra flexible blades on bigger fish. To each his own though. Forschner holds an edge well, is easy to sharpen and is not terribly expensive.

Don

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Forschner 10 or 12 cimintar ( kinda curved blade)  Makes short work of salmon.

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I agree with the guy that said a conventional blade works best for trout and salmon... Rapala makes a really nice knife it has a blue handle 11" blade and comes with a gray plastic case you can find it at cabelas for just over 20 bucks .. its the best knife I own holds an edge like nothing I've ever seen and for that price you cant go wrong

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Forschner 10 or 12 cimintar ( kinda curved blade)  Makes short work of salmon.

X2

Shawn

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I have used a knife from cutco , a fillet knife that goes from 8. Inches to 12 inches, by sliding out of the handle trays share and guaranteed. For life , what ever that is worth

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 Thanks for the suggestions. I have an electric I like and a Cutco but for bigger trout and salmon I believe the 12" Forschner is the one to add to my collection. The guarantee  and the case with sharpener on the Cutco are awesome. They have replaced two knives for me, no questions asked.

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Any knife will work as long as you know how to wield it

Exactly right!

7 inch shrade, very flexible, needs a more ergonomic handle, but manageable. Does all things well, fillet, skin, pin bones removed, lateral line fat out. Any size salmon...different method than most...but I get more good flesh than hogging off the sides in one swipe with a stiff ....uhhhh...12 incher...so I don't use it as a rule!:wub:

Sent from mly PC36100 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

Edited by skipper19

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The best knife is a razor  sharp one. And A diamond hone or good steel to keep it that way.

Edited by Has Been

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Exactly right! 7 inch shrade, very flexible, needs a more ergonomic handle, but manageable. Does all things well, fillet, skin, pin bones removed, lateral line fat out. Any size salmon...different method than most...but I get more good flesh than hogging off the sides in one swipe with a stiff ....uhhhh...12 incher...so I don't use it as a rule!:wub: Sent from mly PC36100 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

 

Skipper

 

How about sharing this method?  Might be we can all learn something, it's always seemed funny to me that I use a bigger knife to filet a salmon than I do to butcher a cow.

 

Thanks

 

Roy

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I also like the 10" and 12" Victorinox Cimeter knives for filleting medium and large salmon, but from time to time I have someone that would like steaks instead of fillets. For "steaking" a large salmon I found the 14" Victorinox Cimeter easily sections right through the backbone with little effort.

 

Here's a nice video on how to properly sharpen one of their knives:  http://www.victorinox.com/us/content/video/KnifeSharpeningVideo/KnifeSharpeningVideo/6.8713.20US1

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Skipper

How about sharing this method? Might be we can all learn something, it's always seemed funny to me that I use a bigger knife to filet a salmon than I do to butcher a cow.

Thanks

Roy

I think you already know some of it if you're used to butcher cutting cows. Sorta like removing the shank from a leg.

I'll do my best to explain it here and eventualy I can try to put a thread up with a pictorial display or maybe a video.

Like I previously mentioned, I use a 7 inch blade, but also have done this with a six incher. The key is flexibility of the blade and of course be sharp.

Step1 ...lay fish flat on a table either side up and see the lateral line running the length of the body from gill collar to tail along the mid section. That line is directly in line with the spine. You will cut into the line down to the spine all the way from gill collar to tail.

Step 2... Make three 90 degree cuts across that lateral line cut just made, starting at the tail where the meat ends, then one across the lateral line just behind the anal fin. The next just behind the dorsal fin. You could do one more midway to the collar but it splits the pin bones into more pieces and makes more work for removing them.

Step 3...at the head cut around the gill collar so that you get the nice meat around and under the gill plate and go around the pectoral fin.

Now what you have is 6 sections of meat to carve away from the spine and ribs. Just make sure to not cut too deeply into gut cavity on the cross cuts unless you maybe already gutted and gilled the fish before putting them in your cooler. That's the best way to get good tasty fillets if you can do that. If not then be careful not to cut into the guts.

Step 4...this is where the flexible blade is a must. At the tail, insert your blade in the lateral line and carve away the upper section of meat using the spine and radius bones as a guide. I leave the skin attached to the body so I have an easy grab with my free hand on the fish as I flip the carved section over and skin that section off the body. Repeat for the lower section by the same method. Move to the next section forward and remove those in the same order. Top first then bottom. Flip and skin off.

The last sections are longer and contain the pin bones in the upper section. Place your blade in the lateral line cut behind the gill collar and carve from the spine outwards toward the dorsal fin using the radius bones as a guide. You will be cutting through the pin bones as you follow the skeleton. Flip the section and carve the skin off.

Now the last section is the rib side. Angle the blade in the direction of the ribs and carve it down using the ribs as a guide on the knife flat. On this piece I flip the section and carve through the skin and leave the belly section and fins on the carcass. Just skin the section as you would for any fillet.

That is it for one side. The other side is the same method and progression. The main reason for removing the top sections first is to give you more room to angle the blade and move it towards the tail and down on the lower sections so as to not puncture into the gut cavity and follow the direction of the ribs and radius bones.

Pin bones can be removed along with a small thin strip of flesh from the section that came from the top in front of the dorsal fin. Run your fingers over the inside of the fillet and you can feel them. Sharpen your blade and make a slit along the outside of the pin bone line. Work carefully along it and carve away what I call the back strap of the fish. It's boneless. Now go the other side of the pin bones and slice away the thin flesh that will contain the pin bones. Now you have boneless fillets all skinned, in six serving size pieces from one side of the fish. When you get done with both sides, you have 12 nice size fillets and the carcass will be nearly bare bones and flaps of skin hanging. If done carefully you will be surprised how much more edible flesh you get. It's a great way to honor the king by enjoying as much as possible of its fleshy goodness.

I'll try to find pics or get some done in the near future. It's not hard, it does take a little time more than one swipe with the bubba, but when all done the fillets are all serving size and ready for the grill.

Mark

Sent from my PC36100 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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I have used a knife from cutco , a fillet knife that goes from 8. Inches to 12 inches, by sliding out of the handle trays share and guaranteed. For life , what ever that is worth

I also have a cutco knife that I got for a Christmas gift it's really really sharp. Have used it three seasons and its adjustable from 6" to 9" and works great.

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Skipper

Thanks for all the detail, I'll have to give this a try. Probably won't be to pretty at first.

You need to get together with Ruff Rider and do an instructional video. I'm sure it is not as complicated as it sounds.

Roy

Edited by mudflat

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This is with a 12" dexter Russell sani-safe

I prefer a 14" victorinox forchner cimitar for salmon. get a graton edge if you can. It skins better.

Same cuts for salmon except I take the side off the fish. Lay it skin side up and punch a hole with the blade 1" from the tail of the fillet. This allows me to grab the hole with my middle finger and skin the fillet in one swipe.

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I have used a knife from cutco , a fillet knife that goes from 8. Inches to 12 inches, by sliding out of the handle trays share and guaranteed. For life , what ever that is worth

 

I'll second what he said about the cutco knife. Not cheap, but the guarantee is second to none. I like the way you can lengthen it too if needed.

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Forschener or Victorinox 10 inch

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