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FishingTheFL

What do you do during a storm

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I finally got caught up with work and want to get some fishing it but haven't been out due to these afternoon storms. Weekends are already tough getting out of the water. Near impossible when a storm rolls in. Is there some kind of lighting protection I can install encase of not being able to get off the water? 16' thompson. With Bimini

 

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A bible........ it ain’t worth the risk of even attempting to stay out on the water during a storm.


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And don't be waiting for the storm to get to you before pulling lines and getting out of there, lightning can strike up to 10 miles away from the storm center.  First low rumble in the distance I am out of there ASAP!  I was trolling up in the Adirondacks once and noticed the rods start to vibrate, then glow.  Saint Elmo's Fire.  Thunder was not far behind, but by then I had reeled everything in and was half way back.  Lightning is like eye accidents, you don't often get second chances!

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As has been posted many times no fish is worth risking your life for [ eg as what happened out of Point Breeze last August ] ; always get a weather report before going out ! check the baurometric pressure [ a falling pressure is often not good ] Watch the clouds esp. the bright white ones going straight up [ called vertical development ] and note the wind direction if the wind direction changes the weather may also be changing and usually not good . Note any " crackles " on the radio indicating lightening , may be a good time to be close to shore to get off the water !

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All good advice Mike. No matter how tempted don't tempt Mother Nature....you'll lose every time.

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I was thinking more how people can be asses at the dock when trying to get out. Just wondering how you tournament guys deal with it and the bass guys trying to all get off the lake at the same time. Main reason I haven't been out this weekend. During the week I get no time.

Obviously I'm not going out in it.

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I was thinking more how people can be asses at the dock when trying to get out. Just wondering how you tournament guys deal with it and the bass guys trying to all get off the lake at the same time. Main reason I haven't been out this weekend. During the week I get no time.

Obviously I'm not going out in it.

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Yes to your point, it’s an absolute sh**** show if your coming in with everyone else at the same time. Add pouring blinding rain and wind to the recipe. The bass guys are honestly the last to come in if it’s a tournament. Me? which I’m usually already in but it happens, I’m getting to a dock, tying off and sitting in the truck watching front row action. Id worry about getting the boat out later.


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I was thinking more how people can be asses at the dock when trying to get out. Just wondering how you tournament guys deal with it and the bass guys trying to all get off the lake at the same time. Main reason I haven't been out this weekend. During the week I get no time.

Obviously I'm not going out in it.

Sent from my moto e5 play using Lake Ontario United mobile app



Yes to your point, it’s an absolute sh**** show if your coming in with everyone else at the same time. Add pouring blinding rain and wind to the recipe. The bass guys are honestly the last to come in if it’s a tournament. Me? which I’m usually already in but it happens, I’m getting to a dock, tying off and sitting in the truck watching front row action. Id worry about getting the boat out later.


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Is an aluminum boat less risky than a fiber glass one ?

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Is an aluminum boat less risky than a fiber glass one ?
You are so he high point in the area regardless of hull material so i would say no. I left early today seeing a storm west. I saw it just slightly decrease in size but pick up anyway after fishing only half of the morning It kept getting smaller and ultimately dissipated but i dont regret coming in. I dont want to come in with the crowd, get soaked or get zapped. I have had the pants scared off of me a few times. I dont play around with this lake. I was on another where we had rods buzzing and the lines we were setting were picking up off the water and holding in the air (bait too). Granted light line and very small trolled baits for land locks but it was a moment i dont want to repeat. Bolt hit a tree on an island 1/4 mile from us.

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We ran in this morning just ahead of the storm, and after everything was put away, as I was walking to the truck, lightning struck just South of the marina, so close that I felt the percussive shock from the thunder. What a rush! After I cleaned out my britches, we went to breakfast. I was done for the day, but some of the guys got back out on the lake after the storm rolled through. I was caught once 13 miles out in a thunderstorm. Never again.

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The best lightning protection is not being out on the lake in your boat when the storm rolls through. Get the app ‘My Radar’ ... pretty sure it’s free but you can buy upgrades for cheap. The free version is all you need on your cell phone so you can check the real time Doppler periodically while your out on the lake and before you leave. Also, check out the marine forecast on Wunderground.com.  

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all great advice!!!

back in the early 90s a buddy and me got stuck on Hemlock lake a bad tstorm swept over the hill from the west and right on us we ran to shore dragged the 14ft starcraft up on the bank and ran like hell up into a ravine and huddled scared to death while bolts blasted away over the water and tree tops above. close calls like that make you way more cautious never cut it close man its not worth it.

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Must not have been very appetizing sitting next to  Keith at breakfast Brian:lol:

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Since the original poster was asking a what if you get caught out I will address that only all of the previous posts are good but IF you can’t run and you are stuck...

 

One get as close to shore line as possible so you are not the highest point.

 

Two fold all antennas down to lower your profile

 

Three anchor your boat solidly and maintain an anchor watch for dragging.

 

Four if you can tie up to any dock you can exit the boat and get under tree cover.

 

Five if you can’t anchor or tie up to any dock stay close to shore heave to bow into wind, keep engine running and be prepared for changing wind direction keep bow into wind and quartering to any significant waves...

 

Ultimately not being there is the best... but those are things you can do to help if you get pinched...

 

 

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1,4, and 5 all involve getting close to shore.   I maintain that unless you are almost on top of shore to begin with, you should be able to see a storm coming long before it gets on top of you so that you would be "stuck."   Even most of the Fingers with their N/S orientation are large enough to not get surprised.  Hemlock and Canadice, not so much.  I have run up to full speed with all my lines out, once  (admittedly one rigger and a couple of junk lines is a much smaller spread than a LO boat would have out) and then had to replace all the line, to get closer to shore when an overcast with no noise day suddenly started making noise and throwing off sparks.  I don't get the anchoring, and that could be problematic if you're doing 150 down over 300'.    I don';t think I would anchor and then stand up and shake my fist angrily at the sky! ;)

 

As to reaching shore and tying off and going further inland to get out of the lightning, we were told by the police on 4th Lake  that in an emergency, private property rights are trumped by the responsibility to offer assistance and sanctuary to a boat in need.  This does not include mother needing to use indoor plumbing, but riding out a t-storm should certainly qualify. 

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1,4, and 5 all involve getting close to shore.   I maintain that unless you are almost on top of shore to begin with, you should be able to see a storm coming long before it gets on top of you so that you would be "stuck."   Even most of the Fingers with their N/S orientation are large enough to not get surprised.  Hemlock and Canadice, not so much.  I have run up to full speed with all my lines out, once  (admittedly one rigger and a couple of junk lines is a much smaller spread than a LO boat would have out) and then had to replace all the line, to get closer to shore when an overcast with no noise day suddenly started making noise and throwing off sparks.  I don't get the anchoring, and that could be problematic if you're doing 150 down over 300'.    I don';t think I would anchor and then stand up and shake my fist angrily at the sky!
 
As to reaching shore and tying off and going further inland to get out of the lightning, we were told by the police on 4th Lake  that in an emergency, private property rights are trumped by the responsibility to offer assistance and sanctuary to a boat in need.  This does not include mother needing to use indoor plumbing, but riding out a t-storm should certainly qualify. 

If you are paying attention to Radar and you pay attention to clouds you might see it coming, however thunderstorms can be imbedded in other cloud cover and can move upwards of 50 kts speed over ground. It is not that hard while out fishing and doing other activities to be caught unaware. They also don’t necessarily give you warning thunder... The guidance is get off the water if you can, the next is get as close to taller items as you can. Anchoring allows you to stay low in the boat.. not having to drive.. the depth is an obvious duh if it’s too deep ..I forgot to add shutting off all electronics.... The worst position is to be in the middle of the lake.... I doubt anyone would have a problem providing shelter if you put your boat into shore though no legal duty exists...


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16 hours ago, Sk8man said:

Must not have been very appetizing sitting next to  Keith at breakfast Brian:lol:

Is it ever? :-o:lol::rofl:

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To all the guys who have given thoughtful, considered responses to the original question: your input is much appreciated. To unnamed others: go sit on a Gambler rig :rofl:!!

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If you are even thinking about going in don't think about it.... act!  My place is RIGHT at the launch and every single storm i watch idiots struggle with the weather and a crowded launch.   

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On Lake Ontario, I wouldn't go offshore more than 1 mile when T-storms are in the forecast. That might mean going for bass instead of salmon. Preferably stay within 1/2 mi of shelter (place to tie to a dock, beach the boat or hide under a bridge. When storms are in the forecast, you should have a plan of what to do just in case, and be ready to implement that plan in a moment's notice. If you have technology to give you warnings and to watch for developing storms, you should use it accordingly and always keep an eye on the sky because a storm can sometimes develop quickly right before your eyes.

 

Once, back in the early eighties, I was alone on the south end of Canandaigua Lake in a 14 ft rowboat I rented from the marina at the south west corner. I had my own 5hp motor on it. I was fishing in the south east corner for LMB when a storm came barrelling over the hill on the west side. By the time I got my line in and the motor started it was already poring hard and lightening was hitting the top of the hill. It took what seemed like forever to get back to the marina and I actually saw lightening hit the water north of me on the way in. I am not sure if I had wet my pants because my clothes were soaked to the bone by the time I got to shelter. Now I feel a little more comfortable in a situation like that in the boat I have now that can go close to 30mph.

 

Once I was on Oneida Lake with a friend fishing in a cove on a beautiful partly cloudy day when a storm came out of nowhere barreling toward us. We went directly to one of the nearest docks and tied up as the rain was starting. We found out there was nobody home at the house so we were heading toward a small gazebo for cover when a guy at the house next door offered for us to sit it out on his enclosed porch. The storm didn't last long (maybe 1/2 hr) but it was powerful with high winds (gusts were probably 40 or 50 mph) and torrential rain. Even in the cove there was two foot chop pushing against the boat and there was heavy thunder and lightening. After it blew over, the sky cleared right up and the wind calmed down so we went back out to fish some more. We discovered that the wind and waves pushing on the boat pulled one of the steel dock supports right out from under the wood dock. We went right back out in the cove and immediately started to catch a few nice walleye and some LMB and pickerel throwing cranks. The weather was great the rest of the day.

 

Needless to say, I have a great deal of respect for the weather mother nature can throw at you. It can easily catch you off guard.

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Avoid storms if possible. On rare occasion despite weather predictions one can descend upon Y. Get to the launch r if severe enough the most convenient private slip. Any folks I encountered  didn't mind letting me tie up for a while in an emergency.

Once It came in so quick within (5 - 10) minutes I couldn't see more than 5 - 6 feet in front of boat,with  high waves, thunder - lightening to boot. Even with bilge pump running I took on so much water the back of boat was swamped. Couldn't plane due to visibility, very concerning to say the least.

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