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Best boat for salmon fishin


cheese

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After years I finally have the ok to buy a brand new boat.im really not sure what kind to buy for lake

Ontario,I'm looking for a 21-23 footer,in the price range around 25000.n I was told to stick with a outboard.any help is very much apprised thanks

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Are you slipping it or towing ? On the average how many people will be going out with you ? Will your wife want to  spend the night on it or day cruise with it [ porta potti of some sort ] ? Most  outboards in that size range will require a kicker. How much have you allocated for equipment like downriggers,autopilot,gps,radar and fishfinder ? Hardtop/Walkaround/Cuddy/Center Console/ Aluminum or Glass ? I agree with the used and in your price range and size you may have to. Besides what listed on this site there is a 21' SeaRay Laguna listed in the Buffalo Craigslist for 13,000 and may meet your criteria. Personally I would slip it and go with the biggest one I could find or feel comfortable in for Ontario.

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As far as outboard vs inboard there are pros and cons to each. I/Os will usually have a doghouse unles they have jackshafts and that means fishing and landing around the house. More maintenance with a I/O as well. Inboards are hard to find in that footage but if you do, the house is gone and the deck opens up. I would rather work on a "car" engine than a Outboard ,just because I am more familiar with them. Never had a outboard on that size boat, maybe someone else will chime in.

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It's preference thing. I have had both and personally my last boat was 26 foot Trophy with Twin Etec outboards and I loved it. It was a fish catching machine. I worked on both and both are different to work on but IMO outboards are a lot easier as for ease of access to things. Inboard or I/O's have less to maintain but if you know the motor then it's not hard. As for the boat make well yah do some searching cause that is an opinion based thing and you could find a hell of a boat for your budget.

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The Steiger is probably the best lake boat for the money. That does not mean that other boats are not good. It is just that I like the Steiger set-up. They have a nice cabin and a very good deck work space, which reminds me of a lobster boat. The outboard(s) also lengthen the fishing season ( winterizing can be done well after freezing has started). The Steiger can still be towed easily. If you are into outboards and aluminum ,you should check out the Bracket Islanders.

https://www.google.com/search?q=steiger+boats&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Edited by rolmops
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Buying new is a HORRIBLE investment regarding what you will receive back when you sell it. Worse than cars. Buy at the bottom of the value curve, put a little sweat equity into her and you can sell to a new owner similar to what you payed for it.

Edited by Gill-T
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You gained some sound advice above.  It may also pay to go back to basics for a bit. First of all are you only going to be fishing Lake O? If you fish other lakes you may wish to consider that. If you fish solo will you be able to handle the boat by yourself? Bigger can be better but not in the wind against or behind you coming into the dock by yourself.Is it going to be used solely for fishing OR will you be doing family stuff recreationally as well? A deep Vee cuts through the water and waves nicely but it may not have as much stability as some other hull designs when multiple folks are standing in the back on one side for example and you can get wet feet on some boats this way. Will you be able to set the boat up in the way you wish for the type of equipment you have or the way you intend to fish?

 

Basically in terms of fishing any boat you get should be considered a platform that allows you to get out away from shore and fish the way you want or need to. Does the boat (s) being considered do everything you wish or need to do? Probably not in every case because every design is usually a compromise so you have to make carefully weighed decisions about what is most important.  A new boat is a huge investment and seldom do you get a good financial return on your investment with it but warantees are a consideration, and with used boats there is always the question of how it was used and maintained as well as the current integrity of the hull and engine etc. Just a few minor things to think about :lol:  Good luck!

Edited by Sk8man
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There is a lot of choices out there. 25000 will not buy you a brand new boat with trailer, but if you have that cash to spare for down payment you could get a brand new boat with low monthly payments, be covered by industry standard warranty of at least 5 years or more. Some 10 years!..outboard is easy in all aspects of a boat that size. I would go to the boat shows that come in the winter months. Look at them, step aboard. Imagine the fishing layout. You could also subscribe to a few magazines that give real time reviews of boats for fishing. One is Salt Water Sportsman, I get that one, and every month there are more than a few boats tested with pricing. Like some have already mentioned there is way more than just a boat, motor, and trailer to consider that can add up to 5 to 10 grand, specific to fishing Lake O. I can tell you that hull design is everything on Lake Ontario. I lean toward heavy, therefore fiberglass, deep V with reverse chines. Best of both worlds in rough water, at speed, or at 2.5 mph. High forward freeboard, lowered cockpit aft. Trailer is a consideration too. In my case, I launch, load solo, and a bunk is easy. Rollers are ok, but you can't unhook the boat until it's in the water. The bunks keep the boat on the trailer down the ramp. Same going on the trailer. Power load to the forward stantion and it stays, pull it out. No wading, or walking the plank.

Sent from my SM-N900P using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Thanks for all the responses I just found out my boss knows some people that Can hopefully get me a good deal on a good used boat that I'm lookin for,n he said to wait till the winter for a better deal so for now I'm just going to a boat show

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I wouldn't want twin outboards due to the cost of replacing down the road. A new drive and engine for an I/O is way cheaper.

Oh I know it all to well, 4 months after I bought the boat I had no options cause the fuel mileage on the twins that were on boat were killing my wallet. I replaced with new Etecs and didn't need fuel a month and that was taking 15-20 trips out a month. If I did it all over again I would get inboards.
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I wouldn't want twin outboards due to the cost of replacing down the road. A new drive and engine for an I/O is way cheaper.

Brian is right there, but a boat of up to 27 feet can be powered with a big single. If you see a boat powered by the old Yamaha OX66, from 2001 up, those are good 2 strokes and go up to 250 hp. Yamaha would like to see those old motors go away because it's hard to market out their new stuff when there are still some of these old "perfect" motors around, lasting many many years. Stay away from the HPDI motors that they had out to replace the OX66 though. I have a 225 OX and it pushes my 24 foot Aquasport center console just fine. 45 mph trimmed out, and the motor is not fussy about oil. I use a synthetic blend from cabela's that is about 15 dollars a gallon. Pour it in the remote tank and it measures it out for proper ratio. This motor has been good to me for 8 years, and never been to a dealer or shop. Minor maintenance things that are easy for the backyard shade tree mechanic, makes these old motors a great power unit for a fishing boat. Of course you might need a kicker to troll, as it would be way more economical and less maintenance. A four stroke kicker works well and no fuss with oil. Just things to consider when buying a used outboard, look around for good repo boats. That's how I got mine. Very low hours, like new, fully equipped tournament boat, and 1/3 cost of new. The new boat I was looking at was a foot less and cost twice as much, and I would have had to equip the new boat with all electronic, and downriggers, and the kicker motor. This boat even came with a set of outriggers. All totaled would have cost new more than 80,000. Be mindful that most guys buy a new boat and want something different in a couple years. Maybe too small, maybe it has some inconvenience, so if you get the "right one"..you may have it for 20 or 30 years, and then the new boat is a good investment if taken care of carefully.

Sent from my SM-N900P using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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