Jump to content

Recommended Posts

The one looking brown looks like a goby, a lot of the predator type fish are eating those slimy buggers!! Walleyes, smallies lakers, maybe the kings also. In my mind it’s a good thing, if they feed on them. We will never get rid of them all. Hopefully the fish will fill the void??

Link to post
Share on other sites

There may be a downside later on to the eating of the gobies though as they are bottom dwellers/feeders and that is where many of the environmental contaminants exist so the eventual assimilation of them maybe end up in the fish eating them. I believe they also can harbor botulism from what I have read.....always something...

Edited by Sk8man
Link to post
Share on other sites

Our SLR fish are just gorging on those gobies and getting chunky as a result. Walleye, smallmouth and pike for sure. Mergansers not shy about them all winter. Cormorants come summer. Watching them from the dock - they seem to be easy prey...not too fast and they move in short hops.

 

Need to spend more time on my brown jig imitators. Storm makes a big paddletail swimbait that rocked the pike for us as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎18‎/‎2018 at 8:49 AM, Sk8man said:

There may be a downside later on to the eating of the gobies though as they are bottom dwellers/feeders and that is where many of the environmental contaminants exist so the eventual assimilation of them be end up in the fish eating them. I believe they also can harbor botulism from what I have read.....always something...

Organisms exposed to Botulism toxin do not live very long.  And for the botulism organism (Clostridium botulinum) to develop, the host must already be dead, as the organism is anaerobic, will only grow in an oxygen free environment.  The hypothesis for Type E botulism, blamed for bird deaths (notably loons and mergansers) in Erie and Ontario, is that as Dreissenids (Zebra and Quagga mussels) colonize and grow, they build layers on older mussel shells.  Eventually, the mussels at the bottom die, and decompose, using up oxygen in the surrounding water.The overlaying layers prevent movement of oxygenated water down to the base layers, and in that oxygen free environment, Type E develops.  The toxins move to the surface of the mussel colony and affect those mussels, which are then ingested by gobies.  These gobies become ill, and are then easier for the birds to catch, then the birds die.  Drum, which also feed on the mussels and small fish in the vicinity, are most susceptible.  If you catch a fish that is obviously sick, does not fight, etc, maybe it has botulism, DO NOT EAT IT,  but healthy fish will not be a problem, at least for botulism.  Other toxins move up through the food chain, starting with phytoplankton, so alewife eaters get just as much toxin as goby feeders.  Lake trout have more toxins because generally at any given size, they are older, so have been accumulating materials for a longer time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think a lot of people mistaken Gizzard Shad for Alewife. If you're catching these Browns around bays, ponds, or rivers they are probably Gizzard Shad this time of year. I had a Brown Trout puke up a Smelt this weekend and a Goby. You can go to the Tweets page to see the pic. Most of their diet right now is Gizzard Shad and Goby though from what I've been seeing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I only kept 4 on Saturday, but the ones I did clean had empty stomachs. It is telling though that over 1/2 of my hits came on gold or goby patterns


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...