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Hachimo

Looking for advice for a new rod spread for next year.

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Hey fellas, this was my first year fishing Lake Ontario.  I did well for a rookie but now i want to experiment with rod spreads for next year to cover more area.  I spent alot of money this year between buying a boat,riggers, and gear so my budget was limited.  I run a25ft trophy. My spread consisted of 4 riggers with two rods on each with occasional cheaters. If lake was rough then Two riggers were out.  Durring the winter i would like to further equip my boat and purchase more gear.  My thoughts were putting a planer mast on each side then running 250-500copper 40ft or so of each side of boat. Then a dipsey off each side maybe on 2nd setting. Then keeping the riggers behind the boat.  This probly sounds like non-sence to some of u seasoned vets but any inmput would be greatly appreciated. Also if anyone has any copper combos there lookin to sell i would be interested. PM me and let me what ya got.  

Thanks guys

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Two riggers, one rod each. 1-2 wire divers per side (reg and mag size for deep and slide diver for upper), 1 weighted steel per side (rather than copper) off big boards or lead core (when fish are shallower) off inline boards.

Keep in mind that often 2 well run rigger rods will outfish 4 riggers and 8 rods that are overpowering your presentation.

Spreading out a pattern with a couple rods each riggers, divers, and weighted long lines will up your catch on big kings that are often put off by two much gear being pulled through a small area of water.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

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Thank you for the info. So my thoughts are somewhat on the right track.  I over presentated my spread my last few trips and it showed. Every boat around me was killing fish and i was skunked until i ran only two rigger rods

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Yes, that was all i had to work with last year.  8 only on calm days but the occasional 8 rod tangled was a nightmare.  

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The more rods / lines out or wider spread . The boat control is critical. so you need a second guy or a third guy that could help set lines. driving the boat standing in the center of the boat and looking out backwards will end up in mess fast . I think the above Post and yourself has answered your own question. I find having a positive attitude and the will to experiment and learn gose a long ways.

Sent from my XT1609 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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Simple spreads are proven to produce more fish....
For instance, I used to run 5 riggers. As the zebra mussels have cleared the water, the fish can be spooky. I switched to 3 riggers and as an average i took more rigger shots.... My theory is less cable hum in the water column.
90% of the time I run fixed or slide cheaters in order to get more lures in the strike zone.
Divers- usually only one per side....
Junk lines- if it's rough- one copper or lead core ( depending on where the temp is) down the chute.... If conditions are ok ( boat traffic or waves) then I will run one on each side off Otter Boats..
Simple spreads mean less tangles, your lures are in the strike zone longer, and easier to manage if you get more than one fish on... Tight lines

Sent from my VS996 using Lake Ontario United mobile app

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11 hours ago, John E Powell said:

Two riggers, one rod each. 1-2 wire divers per side (reg and mag size for deep and slide diver for upper), 1 weighted steel per side (rather than copper) off big boards or lead core (when fish are shallower) off inline boards.

Keep in mind that often 2 well run rigger rods will outfish 4 riggers and 8 rods that are overpowering your presentation.

Spreading out a pattern with a couple rods each riggers, divers, and weighted long lines will up your catch on big kings that are often put off by two much gear being pulled through a small area of water.


Sent from my iPhone using Lake Ontario United

x2 on this.  Less is more, especially with you have a big king going ape sh*t behind your boat.  

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if your going to run divers I suggest getting the lite bite slide diver. I use mine like a dipsy without using the slide part. just tie to the front then tie your leader to a small split ring and lace it through the back going through the lite bite arm. but they make a kit that weighs 7 oz's and a big ring and they will get deep in a hurry.

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On October 12, 2018 at 6:41 AM, Missdemeanor said:

Simple spreads are proven to produce more fish....
For instance, I used to run 5 riggers. As the zebra mussels have cleared the water, the fish can be spooky. I switched to 3 riggers and as an average i took more rigger shots.... My theory is less cable hum in the water column.
90% of the time I run fixed or slide cheaters in order to get more lures in the strike zone.
Divers- usually only one per side....
Junk lines- if it's rough- one copper or lead core ( depending on where the temp is) down the chute.... If conditions are ok ( boat traffic or waves) then I will run one on each side off Otter Boats..
Simple spreads mean less tangles, your lures are in the strike zone longer, and easier to manage if you get more than one fish on... Tight lines

Sent from my VS996 using Lake Ontario United mobile app
 

X3, most of the time I run a chute copper, sometimes one off each side. One thing I do believe in is the free sliders with flutter spoons, usually Evil Eyes. You cover more of the upper part of the zone and I get a lot of steelies and later cohos with them. 

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I run a 25’ trophy. My setup is 3 riggers across the back and then rod holders on each gunnel. I always run the two corner riggers and dispys off each side. The center rigger either goes in or the rod holder can be used for copper down the chute.

My best setup all season was three riggers, 2 dipsys on the starboard side, one dipsy on the port side and a copper off the board on the port side.

IMG_1392.JPG


‘Bout Time
Mike

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All good advice. Keep the following phrase in the back of your mind: "Less is more". There are times when a large spread can work but the key to it all is having a basic plan for the specific specie (s) you are targeting, and pay close attention to detail to see what they are responding to (or not). You can always selectively add to the mix as your plan or results change but get the most out of what you put out there by concentrating on actually fishing rather than loading up the water with a huge spread. There can be a lot of value in being as "stealthy" as possible too with the increased water clarity as mentioned and it probably outweighs the tactic of loading up the water with objects.

Edited by Sk8man

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